The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Enhancing Students Language Skills through Blended Learning  pp223-232

Choosri Banditvilai

© Jul 2016 Volume 14 Issue 3, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp150 - 232

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper presents a case study of using blended learning to enhance students language skills and learner autonomy in an Asian university environment. Blended learning represents an educational environment for much of the world where computers and the Internet are readily available. It combines self‑study with valuable face‑to‑face interaction with a teacher. This study puts the spotlight on learning outcomes in an English for Specific Purposes (ESP) class in Thailand in which e‑learning str ategies are used in parallel with traditional classroom language teaching methods of the four language learning skills. These skills are listening, speaking, reading and writing. The achievements and attitudes of students were compared between the control group and the experimental group to measure the potential of available technology to develop language skills and learner autonomy. The findings from this study show that online practice is directly beneficial to enhance the four language learning skills as well as autonomous learning and learner motivation.

 

Keywords: Keywords: blended learning, e-learning, learner autonomy, Communicative Business English, English for Specific Purposes, ESP, motivation

 

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Journal Article

A Learning Analytics Approach to the Evaluation of an Online Learning Package in a Hong Kong University  pp11-24

Dennis Foung, Julia Chen

© Mar 2019 Volume 17 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Heinrich Söbke, pp1 - 65

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Abstract

In recent years, research using learning analytics to predict learning outcomes has begun to increase. This emerging field of research advocates the use of readily‑available data to inform teaching and learning. The current case study adopts a learning analytics approach to evaluate the online learning package of an academic English course in a university in Hong Kong. This study aims to (1) explore the completion pattern of use of the online learning package by students in a generic undergraduate academic skills course; and (2) predict student outcomes based on their online behaviour patterns. Over three academic years, the study examined usage logs for 7000+ students that were available on the university’s learning management system. Student assessment component scores, online activity completion rates, and online behavioural patterns were identified and examined using descriptive analysis, bivariate correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis. The findings reveal insights into different online learning behavioural patterns that would benefit blended course designers. For instance, some students started using the online learning package early in the semester but fulfilled only the minimum required online work, whereas others greatly exceeded the basic requirement and continued doing activities in the online package even after the semester had finished. The relationship between learning activities in the online package and assessment component grades was found to be weak but meaningful. A regression model was developed drawing on the completion rates to predict overall student scores, and this model successfully identified several specific factors, such as total number of attempts and performance in individual online learning activities, as predictors of the final course grade.

 

Keywords: learning analytics, blended learning; online learning package, English for academic purposes, Hong Kong, course design

 

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Journal Article

Language Proficiency and Smartphone‑aided Second Language Learning: A look at English, German, Swahili, Hausa and Zulu  pp25-37

Eva Maria Luef, Bethel Ghebru, Lynn Ilon

© Mar 2019 Volume 17 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Heinrich Söbke, pp1 - 65

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Abstract

Use and development of applications for smartphones (so‑called ‘apps’) continue to rise, and it comes as no surprise that language learning apps (such as Google Translate) are immensely popular among the younger generation. But, do these apps actual help students learn a language and, if so, how is apps usage influenced by the proficiency of the language learner? Our research focused on the use of apps related to language learning in two major Korean universities. Koreans are known to be high‑tech users and avid language learners, and Korea can therefore provide a good model for how education and technology intersect. We asked students studying German, Swahili, Hausa, and Zulu to inform us about the role that smartphone apps play in their language learning, both at home and in a formal education setting (e.g., classroom). Results showed that one important determiner for how apps were used was language proficiency. We further found an interaction effect between proficiency in English and the other languages, which directly impacted app use. Our findings suggest that these rather sophisticated digital and language learning students make sophisticated choices of apps based on knowledge of apps and the language learning task at hand.

 

Keywords: language apps, language learning, second foreign languages, less commonly taught languages, English

 

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Journal Article

EFL Learners’ Perspectives on the use of Smartphones in Higher Education Settings in Slovakia  pp537-549

Rastislav Metruk

© Dec 2020 Volume 18 Issue 6, Editor: Heinrich Söbke and Marija Cubric, pp462 - 574

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Abstract

MALL (Mobile assisted language learning) affords new opportunities for EFL (English as a foreign language) learners and teachers. Research on MALL is still in its infancy in Slovakia, and this paper attempts to fill in this gap by examining students’ perception and attitudes towards the use of smartphones for the purposes of learning and practicing English. The target population of this study constituted of the Slovak university EFL learners whose major was Teacher Training of English Language and Literature (n = 77) at a Slovak university. The research method employed to achieve the objectives of this study was a 5‑point Likert scale questionnaire, comprising of two sets of statements: general and out‑of‑the‑classroom statements with a total of 29 items. The research results for both sets of statements imply that the participants display moderately positive attitudes towards smartphones in the context of EFL learning. However, the findings also reveal some issues surrounding the perception and potential use of smartphones such as the inability to plan students’ language learning appropriately and effectively, general underuse of smartphone apps, or problems related to practicing speaking skills. The results further suggest the immediate need to develop and enhance the awareness of smartphones and their potential in the process of teaching and learning English so that the EFL learners can utilize considerable opportunities these smart devices offer. Finally, the limitations of this study are recognized, and it is emphasized that conducting further research in this area is urgently needed.

 

Keywords: EFL learner, mobile learning, smartphone and language learning, attitudes and perceptions, process of learning English

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 8 Issue 1 / Jan 2010  pp1‑50

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Editorial

As we enter 2010 it is interesting to reflect how learning has changed over the past decade. Technology has changed considerably over this time period, as have learners’ expectations. In the last 10 years we have gone from internet access as a luxury to many seeing it as a necessity. In this climate it is interesting to look at the data collected by Littlejohn and her colleagues, and to speculate what will happen in the next 10 years, and whether there will be more similarities or differences across the disciplines represented in the papers that form this edition. Shirley Williams Reading January 2010

 

Keywords: assessment for learning, blended learning, collaborative learning, digital literacy, engineering education, English for Academic Purposes (EAP), e-portfolio, , higher education , interdisciplinary collaboration, learning design, learning objects., online assessment, online faculty, online learning, pedagogy, reusability, students’ expectations of technology use, study skills, teacher education, technology-enhanced learning, TPCK, transfer of assessment practices, Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Web 2.0,

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 18 Issue 6 / Dec 2020  pp462‑574

Editor: Heinrich Söbke, Marija Cubric

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Keywords: Community of Inquiry, continuing education, distance education, deep learning design, constructivist learning; academic dishonesty, cheating, online education, distance education, plagiarism; ODeL, online learning tools, mobile learning tools, Moya Messenger App WhatsApp, myUnisa’s ODF; Emotions and learning, flipped learning, university, science education; creativity, personality traits, students, virtual courses, gender differences; EFL learner, mobile learning, smartphone and language learning, attitudes and perceptions, process of learning English; Out-of-classroom communication (OCC), flipped classroom, motivation, intervention; ; ICT integration, ICT infrastructure, high school science teaching

 

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