The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Pedagogical Approaches and Technical Subject Teaching through Internet Media  pp52-65

Olubodun Olufemi

© Mar 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 75

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Abstract

This is a comparison of Instructivist and constructivist pedagogical approaches and their applications in different situations, which make clear the comparative advantages of both approaches. Instructivist learning, places the teacher in authority while the constructivist shifted authority to no one in particular but shared responsibilities between learner and teacher in such a manner that the teacher no longer assumes the responsibilities of the passage of informationknowledge to the learner but only guides him to discover the 'objective truth' out there and in the attainment of learning objectives. Teaching and Learning process was redefined in the light of 'new' understanding in teaching and learning and practical applications of these pedagogical approaches were considered. I presented a study guide (Appendix 1) as an example of socio‑constructivist pedagogy where emphasis in on learning rather than on teaching.

 

Keywords: Study guide, e-learning, pedagogy, socio-constructivism, test, evaluation, LMS, virtual classroom, asynchronous, instructivism, construction technique

 

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Journal Article

The Implications of SCORM Conformance for Workplace e‑Learning  pp183-190

Gabrielle Witthaus

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp85 - 190

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Abstract

This paper explores the impact that SCORM conformance has had on workplace e‑learning. The author describes a project in which she was requested to "repurpose" some materials that had originally been designed for the face‑to‑face teaching of English as a Foreign Language, into SCORM conformant e‑learning materials. The rationale for this request was that the training centre management wanted to track learners' progress via a Learning Management System (LMS). However, in order to integrate SCORM‑conformant tracking functionality into the programmes, the learning materials would have to have been stripped of all the collaborative, productive and communicative aspects of their pedagogy. The learning designers and training centre management had to engage in a steep learning curve to find an alternative solution that was both pedagogically sound and administratively efficient. This anecdote highlights some of the challenges facing the corporate sector in terms of the management of e‑learning content. To put the issues into context, the paper gives an overview of SCORM, and defines some related terminology — Sharable Content Objects (SCOs), LMS and Learning Content Management System (LCMS). SCORM conformance has two main aims: the ability to deliver content on any Learning Management System, and the ability to track learners' actions and scores when they use the materials. It is argued that, while the higher education sector has chosen to emphasise the first aim, focusing more on the development of stimulating learning content that can be shared across disciplines and across institutions, the corporate sector has emphasised the second aim, focusing more on tracking learners' progress through learning programmes. It is suggested that this is one of the explanations for the continued proliferation of relatively rigid, behaviourist style teaching materials for workplace e‑learning. This instructivist style pedagogical model is considered in relation to the military and programming origins of SCORM, and a number of more innovative approaches to workplace e‑learning from the recent literature are discussed. The paper concludes by arguing that, for corporate e‑learning programmes to be successful, all stakeholders need to be included in the strategic decisions, and all stakeholders need to engage in a learning process to understand each others' points of view and explore the available options and their consequences. This study will be of value to anyone who needs to develop SCORM conformant courses, as well as managers who are charged with overseeing such projects, or developing an organisational training strategy involving an LMSLCMS.

 

Keywords: learning design, SCORM conformance, LMS, LCMS, learning objects, e-learning 2.0

 

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Journal Article

Can Online Peer Review Assignments Replace Essays in Third Year University Courses? And if so, What are the Challenges?  pp147-158

Martin Smith

© Mar 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, ICEL 2011, Editor: Philip Balcean, pp1 - 158

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Abstract

Essays are a traditional component of the course requirements in many post‑secondary courses. However, the practical and pedagogical disadvantages of essays are significant. These include the increasing ease with which essays can be plagiarized, the lack of peer involvement in the traditional essay submission and feedback process, the usual lack of meaningful instructor‑student intellectual discourse in the essay development and feedback process, and the inability to include hyperlinks and non‑text media in essays submitted on paper. It is suggested that as instructors make the transition from traditional to blended/online instruction, they consider jettisoning the traditional essay requirement and replace it with some form of “assignment essay/peer review” system such as the one described. Contemporary Learning Management Systems facilitate peer review and peer assessment approaches in ways that were not available in traditional offline education. This paper describes and discusses an online assignment system utilizing peer commentaries that addresses many of the shortcomings of these traditional essay requirement. The system is modeled after peer commentary academic journals such as Behavioral and Brain Sciences and Current Anthropology. This system has successfully been used as a substitute for the traditional essay requirement in a number of third year psychology course sections platformed on both Moodle and Blackboard. The advantages, challenges and practicalities of instituting, managing and grading such peer‑reviewed assignments are outlined, and the benefits of the system in terms of student engagement, intellectual modeling, and learning community enhancement are discussed. The peer reviewed assignment system is discussed in the context of recent research indicating some advantages of blended learning approaches compared to traditional approaches. Criticisms of peer feedback approaches are examined, and instructors are encouraged to provide students with detailed instructions and criteria regarding the peer review process. It is hoped that the discussion will be particularly useful to instructors who are in the process of moving from traditional face‑to‑face course context to the blended/online education environment.

 

Keywords: peer assessment, peer review, blended learning, LMS, essays

 

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Journal Article

The Evolution of e‑Learning in the Context of 3D Virtual Worlds  pp147-167

Theodore Kotsilieris, Nikoletta Dimopoulou

© Jun 2013 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Roy Williams, pp80 - 167

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Abstract

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) offer new approaches towards knowledge acquisition and collaboration through distance learning processes. Web‑based Learning Management Systems (LMS) have transformed the way that education is conducted nowadays. At the same time, the adoption of Virtual Worlds in the educational process is of great importance, not only for the researchers in the field of Web‑based Education, but also for the educational community that is interested in applying ICT in education. The main motivation for studying the potential of Virtual Worlds applications in education stems from the capabilities they offer to create a cyberspace where users can interact with other participants (through their avatars) or objects, creating new experiences that are not often feasible in the real world. Within this context, the fundamentals of learning theories have to be analyzed, in order to study their impact on e‑learning and Virtual Learning Environments design. The currently available Virtual‑World platforms are being presented and qualitatively assessed. Subsequently we focus on Sloodle, which bridges the characteristics of the Moodle LMS with the Open Simulator 3D virtual world functionality.

 

Keywords: e-learning, virtual worlds, LMS, sloodle

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Enriched Learning by Converging Knowledge Object & Learning Object  pp3-13

Sai Sabitha, Deepti Mehrotra, Abhay Bansal

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp1 - 56

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Abstract

Abstract: The most important dimension of learning is the content, and an LMS suffices this to a certain extent. The present day LMS are designed to primarily address issues like ease of use, search, content and performance. Many surveys had been conducte d to identify the essential features required for the improvement of LMS, which includes flexibility and a user centric approach. These features can suffice the need of all learners, when they have different learning requirements. For a true learning, kno wledge should also be delivered along with the domain information. Thus, there is a need to design an architecture for user centric Knowledge Driven Learning Management System. Thus for holistic learning, knowledge enriched teaching skills are required, w hich can enhance and increase the thinking skills of the learner to a higher level. The current LMS needs an improvement in the direction of knowledge discovery, exploration so that knowledge enriched learning can be provided to the learner.. It can be ba sed on knowledge engineering principles like ontology, semantic relationship between objects, cognitive approach and data mining techniques. In this paper, we are proposing an idea of an enhanced Learning Object (LO) called Knowledge Driven Learning Obj ect, which can be delivered to the user for better learning. We had used a data mining approach, classification to harness and exploit these objects and classify them according to their metadata, thereby strengthening the content of objects delivered thro ugh the LMS.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Learning object, knowledge objects, lms, kms, classification, decision tree, knowledge driven learning objects, knowledge driven learning management system, e-learning

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 6 Issue 1 / Mar 2008  pp1‑75

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Editorial

A new issue of EJEL brings seven interesting pieces of research from different countries around the world. The learners involved in these researches range from school children to mature postgraduate students; they are of a variety of nationalities, they have differing previous experience and are of both genders. The learners have different modes of working; on‑campus or at a distance, and the educators have a variety of approaches and strategies to meet the difficulties their learners face. Reading these papers gives an insight to the challenges that the e‑Learning community faces. Overwhelmingly I am left with the view that there is no one‑size‑fits‑all in e‑Learning; we must be prepared to consider the individual if e‑Learning is to succeed.

 

Keywords: Asynchronous, community participation, construction technique, culture, curriculum development, distance learning, diversity, e-learning, engagement, evaluation, flexible learning, Greece, higher education, ICT, information and communication technology, instructional design, instructivism, international, LMS, Marginalized, online courses, online evaluation, online learning, participation, pedagogical development., postgraduate studies, quality assessment, secondary, socio-constructivism, study guide, test, time-management, virtual classroom, widening participation

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 6 Issue 2 / Apr 2008  pp99‑182

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Keywords: Asynchronous, community participation, construction technique, culture, curriculum development, distance learning, diversity, e-learning, engagement, evaluation, flexible learning, Greece, higher education, ICT, information and communication technology, instructional design, instructivism, international, LMS, Marginalized, online courses, online evaluation, online learning, participation, pedagogical development., postgraduate studies, quality assessment, secondary, socio-constructivism, study guide, test, time-management, virtual classroom, widening participation

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 11 Issue 2 / Jun 2013  pp80‑167

Editor: Roy Williams

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Keywords: online learning; professional development; perceived usefulness of technology; perceived ease of use of technology; online qualifications, pre-service teacher education; secondary school teachers; technology uses in education; teaching methods, weblogs, blogs, e-learning; online assessment; adaptive assessment; learning management systems; web-based systems; ancient Greek literature; Greek lyric poetry, action research, reflective practitioner, social networking technologies, continuous professional development, virtual classroom, synchronous, online learning, technology adoption, e-cheating, turnitin.com, writecheck.com, plagiarism, face-to-face, online, virtual worlds, LMS, sloodle

 

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