The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

SCImago Journal & Country Rank
 

Journal Article

Assessment in Massive Open Online Courses  pp207-216

Wilfried Admiraal, Bart Huisman, Olga Pilli

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: Open online distance learning in higher education has quickly gained popularity, expanded, and evolved, with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as the most recent development. New web technologies allow for scalable ways to deliver video lect ure content, implement social forums and track student progress in MOOCs. However, we remain limited in our ability to assess complex and open‑ended student assignments. In this paper, we present a study on various forms of assessment and their relationsh ip with the final exam score. In general, the reliability of both the self‑assessments and the peer assessments was high. Based on low correlations with final exam grades as well as with other assessment forms, we conclude that self‑assessments might not be a valid way to assess students performance in MOOCs. Yet the weekly quizzes and peer assessment significantly explained differences in students final exam scores, with one of the weekly quizzes as the strongest explanatory variable. We suggest that both self‑assessment and peer assessment would better be used as assessment for learning instead of assessment of learning. Future research on MOOCs implies a reconceptualization of education variables, including the role of assessment of students achiev ements.

 

Keywords: Keywords: MOOC, Open Online Learning, Higher education, Assessment, Peer assessment, Self-assessment, Quiz

 

Share |

Journal Article

When is Open and Online Learning Relevant for Curriculum Change in Higher Education? Digital and Network Society Perspective  pp88-101

Airina Volungevičienė, Margarita Teresevičienė, Ulf-Daniel Ehlers

© Jan 2020 Volume 18 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Heinrich Söbke, pp1 - 113

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Digital and network society learning happens in new, timeless and borderless spaces. Such society members are always connected and online, sharing and co‑creating knowledge, and their learning needs serve as the biggest driving forces for higher education curriculum change. Open online learning methodology seems to be the best‑suited way to implement this change, in order to meet the needs of digital and network society. This research aims to investigate why and when open online learning is relevant for digital and network society and how open online learning supports curriculum change in higher education to meet the learning needs of digital and network society members. Theoretical research findings are discussed to: a) define the characteristics of digital and networked society, b) identify emerging ways of learning of a digital and networked society, and explain why open online learning is best suited for their needs, c) discuss the gap between the new ways of learning and higher education curricula and how open online learning is relevant for its change. Empirical research is based on global experts’ semi‑structured interviews. The results of the research demonstrate that open online learning should serve as a solution for curriculum change in higher education to respond to digital and network society learning needs. Higher education curricula should change to ensure better flexibility, recognition of non‑formal learning in formal curricula, better collaboration and exchange of people with diverse cultural and social experiences. Assessment and recognition of prior learning in the formal curricula of universities could be one of realistic scenarios for faster adaptation and introduction of more diversified learning paths. The research findings support the need to change the pedagogical approach from teacher‑centred into a learner ‑ centred, small‑group orientated, multi‑dimensional model of teaching, which raise further challenges and research dilemmas for academic community, in order to integrate important elements of change into university practices.

 

Keywords: digital and network society (DNS), open online learning (OOL), higher education (HE) curriculum.

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 18 Issue 1 / Jan 2020  pp1‑113

Editor: Rikke Ørngreen, Heinrich Söbke

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: case study, development, educational change, e-learning, higher education, library, pedagogy, Research paradigm, research aims, research questions, design research, PBL, Medicine, Cloud-based learning, UNIO, Student-Run Free Clinic, Peer-assisted Learning, Web-based learning, Virtual Patient, Medical Education, Family Medicine, Information literacy, ICT4D, information access, contextualisation, education sector, game-based learning, educational games, learning games, framework, dimensions, factors, relations, game analysis, evaluation, design, digital and network society (DNS), open online learning (OOL), higher education (HE) curriculum, MOOC platforms, business model innovation, share economy, open education, Business Model Canvas

 

Share |