The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Outline and Evaluation of a Joint European and Canadian Virtual Mobility: e‑Learning Project  pp35-42

Alan Hilliard

© Feb 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

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Abstract

The "virtual mobility" project was created as part of a joint Canadian and European Commission funded project to explore cross‑cultural clinical curricular developments in the radiation sciences. The aim of the project was to facilitate student learning of the cross‑cultural differences in the delivery of healthcare within the disciplines of diagnostic radiography and radiotherapy. The project was delivered as case study group work, on‑line via the virtual learning environment (VLE) "Blackboard". Upon completion of the project, participants and staff facilitators were encouraged to complete an on‑line questionnaire, which was used to inform future improvements.

 

Keywords: Partnerships in e learning cross-cultural education on-line collaboration group work

 

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Journal Article

Establishing Effective e‑Learning Communities within the Teaching Profession: Comparing Two Projects to Discover the Necessary Ingredients.  pp119-126

Ros Evansand Eileen Bellett

© Jan 2007 Volume 4 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp111 - 148

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Abstract

This article sets out to compare and contrast two different projects, aimed to get primary teachers collaborating online, with respect to advice from research on how to engage participants. The first project tried to encourage teachers in small rural schools to share ideas for the implementation of the National Numeracy Strategy. The second was intended to provide a platform for teachers to develop materials for the teaching of religious education in the classroom. There appears to be four 'necessary ingredients' for the successful establishment of e‑learning communities within practising teachers. These include: face‑to‑face meetings; high quality IT support; outcomes, which are of real benefit to participants; adequate funding. The outcome of the comparison is felt to add to the knowledge of how to encourage participation in online forums within a context outside those normally researched. As such it should help those trying to design similar projects in the future.

 

Keywords: Online collaboration, online forums, face to face meetings, project ownership, Religious Education, National Numeracy Strategy, mixed age classes

 

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Journal Article

The eLIDA CAMEL Nomadic Model of Collaborative Partnership for a Community of Practice in Design for Learning  pp197-206

Jill Jameson

© Nov 2008 Volume 6 Issue 3, Editor: Shirley Williams, Laura Czerniewicz, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

A nomadic collaborative partnership model for a community of practice (CoP) in Design for Learning (D4L) can facilitate successful innovation and continuing appraisals of effective professional practice, stimulated by a 'critical friend' assigned to the project. This paper reports on e‑learning case studies collected by the UK JISC eLIDA CAMEL Design for Learning project, which implemented and evaluated learning design (LD) tools in higher and further education as part of the 2006‑07 JISC Design for Learning pedagogic e‑learning programme. Project partners carried out user evaluations on innovative tools with a learning design function, collecting D4L case studies and LD sequences in post‑16HE contexts using LAMS and Moodle. The project brought together learning activity sequences from post‑16HE partners into a collaborative e‑learning community of professional practice based on the CAMEL (Collaborative Approaches to the Management of e‑Learning) model, contributing to international D4L developments. This paper briefly provides an overview of key project output contributions to e‑learning innovations, including results from teacher and student evaluations using online surveys. The paper explores intentionality in the development of a community of practice in design for learning, reporting on trials of learning design and social software that bridged some of the tensions between formalised intra‑institutional e‑learning relationships and inter‑institutional project team dynamic D4L practitioner development. Following a brief report of practitioner D4L e‑learning case studies and student feedback, the catalytic role of the 'critical friend' is highlighted and recommended as a key ingredient in the successful development of a nomadic model of communities of practice in the management of professional e‑learning projects. eLIDA CAMEL Partners included the Association of Learning Technology (ALT), JISC infoNet, three universities and five FESixth Form Colleges. Results reported to the UK JISC Experts' Pedagogy Group demonstrated e‑learning innovations by practitioners in D4L case studies, illuminated by the role of the 'critical friend', Professor Mark Stiles of Staffordshire University. The project also benefited from case study evaluations by Dr Liz Masterman of Oxford University Learning Technologies Group and the leading work of ALT and JISC infoNet in the development of the CAMEL model.

 

Keywords: e-learning, communities of practice, collaboration, design for learning, JISC, case study

 

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Journal Article

Investigating a Nigerian XXL‑Cohort Wiki‑Learning Experience: Observation, Feedback and Reflection  pp191-202

Peter Aborisade

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

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Abstract

A regular feature of the Nigerian tertiary education context is large numbers of students crammed into small classrooms or lecture theatres. This context had long begged for the creation of innovative learning spaces and adoption of engaging pedagogies. Recourse to technology support and experimenting with the WIKI as a learning tool at the Federal University of Technology, Akure (FUTA), Nigeria gave us an insight into the benefits and challenges of the set‑up and use of new knowledge technologies in our technology‑poor context. This paper reports an experiment in an extra‑large (XXL) class of freshmen (2000+) on a module of second language project writing using the WIKI. The paper emphasises the unique advantages of the WIKI in a large blended learning class and the affordances for socio‑cultural and collaborative learning experience. In creating new learning teams and forging collaboration among learners leveraging one another's abilities, the wiki experience extended the 'classroom' beyond the physical space, engaged students in interactional communication in the second language, encouraged negotiation of meaning, and challenged learners in finding their 'solutions' to real life problems around them, aside from acquisition of hands‑on digital literacy. The paper reports on how learners experienced and participated in learning on a technology supported module. Data for the investigation and evaluation of students' learning experiences were collected using teacher observation of team formation and collaboration on activities offline and tracked students' logs, footprints and activities on group pages online; students' feedback on the end‑of‑course learners' evaluation forms; and their reflections as gleaned from their comments, encouraged and freely made continually by many from inception through to the end of the course, on the front page of our wiki. The report employs both qualitative and quantitative parameters. Results indicated a large number of students felt satisfied that the learning experience, though difficult, was worth their while; it opened up new vistas to the world; it got them working and learning to collaborate in groups; they developed a level of autonomy they would like to keep, and would like more of their courses supported by technology and thought the medium offered hope for the future, as it opened up new vistas in their learning.

 

Keywords: large classes, Wiki, e-learning, learning experience, interaction, collaboration, team work

 

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Journal Article

Implications of the Social Web Environment for User Story Education  pp44-59

Terrill Fancott, Pankaj Kamthan, Nazlie Shahmir

© Mar 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, ICEL 2011, Editor: Philip Balcean, pp1 - 158

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Abstract

In recent years, user stories have emerged in academia, as well as industry, as a notable approach for expressing user requirements of interactive software systems that are developed using agile methodologies. There are social aspects inherent to software development, in general, and user stories, in particular. This paper presents directions and means for incorporating the Social Web environment in user story education. In doing so, it proposes a methodology, SW4USE, for such integration. SW4USE consists of a user story process model, USPM, and Social Web technologies/applications that can contribute to the execution of the steps of USPM. A collection of scenarios of use, for both teachers in their classroom lectures and students in their team‑based course projects, are presented, and potential learning outcomes are given. The ephemeral and essential challenges in the realization of SW4USE, particularly those related to quality, are highlighted.

 

Keywords: agile methodology, collaboration, dissemination, process model, user requirement, Web 2.0

 

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Journal Article

Collaboration Creation: Lessons Learned From Establishing an Online Professional Learning Community  pp60-75

Colin Gray, Keith Smyth

© Mar 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, ICEL 2011, Editor: Philip Balcean, pp1 - 158

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Abstract

This paper describes the design, implementation, evaluation and further refinement of an ELGG‑based social networking site to support professional development activity, project group and special interest groups, and the discussion and sharing of educational experiences and resources across Edinburgh Napier University in the United Kingdom. Beginning with a short overview of what online institutional communities might offer in sustaining good learning, teaching and assessment practice in‑house, this paper then describes the rationale for and development of Edinburgh Napier Education Exchange (ENEE). The subsequent evaluation undertaken employed a mixed method approach involving online questionnaires and individual interviews with users of ENEE, and took place between January and April 2011. The evaluation had a twin focus on use and perceptions of ENEE in general, and how ENEE was beginning to be used to provide additional support opportunities for a diverse group of educators studying on Edinburgh Napier’s online distance learning MSc Blended and Online Education (MSc BOE). Overall the evaluation highlighted a range of ways in which ENEE was proving effective particularly in helping users to ‘keep abreast’ of educational practice across the institution, as well as in supporting small groups dedicated to specific purposes and activities. On the less positive side, the evaluation highlighted a number of issues and challenges around ease of use, engaging in ‘multiple spaces’, and achieving ‘critical mass’ in meaningful use. These findings pointed towards a number of enhancements that were implemented over summer and autumn 2011, and the nature of these recent post‑evaluation changes to ENEE and the MSc BOE group space are detailed in this paper.

 

Keywords: social networks, staff development, collaboration, social presence, lessons learned

 

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Journal Article

Wiki Based Collaborative Learning in Interuniversity Scenarios  pp149-160

Elisabeth Katzlinger, Michael A. Herzog

© May 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEL, Editor: Mélanie Ciussi, pp126 - 226

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Abstract

Abstract: In business education advanced collaboration skills and media literacy are important for surviving in a globalized business where virtual communication between enterprises is part of the day‑by‑day business. To transform these global working sit uations into higher education, a learning scenario between two universities in Germany and Austria was created where students worked together in virtual interregional learning groups. This article reports about a study of an interuniversity collaborative learning scenario within the subject of e‑business. Participating students collaborated virtually and documented a shared case study in a Wiki. When working together, learners used different synchronous and asynchronous tools for close virtual collaborati on around a Wiki toolset such as forum, chat, video conferencing and other social media. Students applied given case studies (e.g. from Harvard Business Review) or they worked out a business case from their own experience, which covered a range of upcom ing e‑business topics. In an attending evaluation study with around 460 participants from two universities, 259 questionnaires were evaluated. It reveals several substantive effects likeTremendous influence of interregional group work for media competenci esHidden social aspects and conflict potentialScenario design and different media usageTeaching effort vs. learning outcome of such a scenarioLearning impact for different student groups depending on gender, employment, graduation or online‑moderation.The findings of this study reveal several interesting aspects concerning media usage and show how students benefited from Wiki work in this virtual learning scenario.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Wiki learning, collaborative learning, virtual collaboration, cross teaching, business education

 

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Journal Article

Understanding and reducing stress in collaborative e‑learning  pp114-121

Naomi Lawless, John Allan

© Jan 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Special Issue for ECEL 2003, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 239

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Abstract

 

Keywords: On-line collaboration, stress, online learning, group roles, group cohesion, culture, reducing stress, barriers to online working, e-teams, e-learning, cyber-stress, techno-stress, virtual teams

 

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