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Journal Article

Online Continuing Education for Health Professionals: Does Sticky Design Promote Practice‑relevance?  pp466-474

Roxanne Ward Zaghab, Carlos Maldonado, Dongsook Whitehead, Felicia Bartlett, Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner

© Dec 2015 Volume 13 Issue 6, ICEL 2015, Editor: Pandora Johnson, pp429 - 474

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Abstract

Abstract: Online continuing education (CE) holds promise as an effective method for rapid dissemination of emerging evidence‑based practices in health care. Yet, the field of CE continues to develop and delivery is predominately face‑to‑face programs. P ractice‑oriented online educational methods and e‑learning platforms are not fully utilized. Educational theorists suggest an experiential approach to CE consistent with adult learning theory. A compelling question remains: Can online asynchronous CE prog ramming prepare health care providers in delivering higher‑level practice competencies?. To address this question, the authors have identified seven composite ⠜sticky⠀ factors that have been critical to the engagement of learners and the creation and delivery of practice‑oriented online educational programs (Zaghab et al, 2015). The sticky factors are based in knowledge management (Nonaka, 1994; Szulanski, 2002) and adult education or andragogy (Knowles, 1970; 1984). In this paper, sticky factor s are mapped to Moore and colleagues⠒ (2009) higher level learning outcomes in health care CE. Data are presented on learner reported practice‑related outcomes in a selection of online CE courses on the CIPS Knowledge Enterprise⌢ portal with the Uni versity of Maryland School of Pharmacy⠒s Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions (CIPS). A dynamic, adaptive e‑learning environment built by technology partner, Connect for Education, Inc., provides the innovative platform and the Acclaim! interactiv e learning technology. This technology‑instructional partnership is dedicated to an iterative continuous improvement process called the Learner Stewardship Cycle (Zaghab et al, 2015). The cycle improves stickiness and learner engagement in order to achi eve higher‑level learning outcomes in CE. Findings suggest that of the 769 learners successfully completing an online course with two or more sticky design segments, the majority report reaching level 4, 5 and 6 learning competencies. Learners from the pr ofessions of pharmacy, nursing, medicine, and other health

 

Keywords: Keywords: Health Care Practitioner, continuing education, situated online learning, learner engagement, continuous improvement, and practitioner-learner

 

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Journal Article

Applying the Community of Inquiry e‑Learning Model to Improve the Learning Design of an Online Course for In‑service Teachers in Norway  pp462-475

Krystyna Krzyszkowska, Maria Mavrommati

© Dec 2020 Volume 18 Issue 6, Editor: Heinrich Söbke and Marija Cubric, pp462 - 574

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Abstract

: Education authorities in Norway endorse online courses for in‑service teachers to raise education standards and to promote digital competence. Naturally, these offerings present teachers with opportunities to integrate new theoretical perspectives and their professional experience in an online learning community. The inquiry into one's professional practice, enhanced by critical reflection in a group of fellow professionals, is considered essential for a lifelong learning practitioner, however, the emerging examples of instructional design tend to prioritise content delivery rather than professional discourse. In this paper, we demonstrate how the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework could be adopted to transform learning design, which prioritises the delivery of individual assignments, into a more collaborative learning experience. Using the CoI instructional design principles and the associated questionnaire, we have investigated student perceptions of learning via an online course and formulated recommendations about how the course design can be refined to promote learning in the community. Despite the modest evidence, this investigation can serve as an example of how a concrete learning design can be improved based on this validated e‑learning model.

 

Keywords: Community of Inquiry, continuing education, distance education, deep learning design, constructivist learning

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 18 Issue 6 / Dec 2020  pp462‑574

Editor: Heinrich Söbke, Marija Cubric

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Keywords: Community of Inquiry, continuing education, distance education, deep learning design, constructivist learning; academic dishonesty, cheating, online education, distance education, plagiarism; ODeL, online learning tools, mobile learning tools, Moya Messenger App WhatsApp, myUnisa’s ODF; Emotions and learning, flipped learning, university, science education; creativity, personality traits, students, virtual courses, gender differences; EFL learner, mobile learning, smartphone and language learning, attitudes and perceptions, process of learning English; Out-of-classroom communication (OCC), flipped classroom, motivation, intervention; ; ICT integration, ICT infrastructure, high school science teaching

 

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