The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Managing e‑Learning: What are the Real Implications for Schools?  pp11-18

Helen Boulton

© Mar 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 75

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Abstract

This paper is concerned with the use of e‑learning in secondary education. It is based on research that has taken place over a period of two years with students aged 14‑16 (Key Stage 4). The paper considers the current research in e‑learning and identifies the challenges faced by students, the changing role of the learner, and the impact e‑ learning can have on students. The author argues that preparation needs to be carried out at the school level prior to introducing e‑learning into the Key Stage 4 curriculum. It concludes by discussing the findings of the research which identifies a range of issues schools may want to consider, when embracing e‑learning.

 

Keywords: e-Learning, secondary, curriculum development, teaching, learning

 

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Journal Article

Evaluation of a MOOC Design Mapping Framework (MDMF): Experiences of Academics and Learning Technologists  pp38-51

John Kerr, Vicki H.M. Dale, Fanni Gyurko

© Mar 2019 Volume 17 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp1 - 63

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Abstract

With the increasing strategic importance of Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) in higher education, this paper offers an innovative approach to advancing discussions and practice around MOOC learning design, in the context of staff development. The study provides a deeper understanding of staff (academic and learning technologists') experience when designing MOOCs, through the evaluation of a novel MOOC design mapping framework (MDMF) at one higher education institution. The MDMF was developed to enhance the MOOC design process for staff involved, providing dedicated, tailored support in this area. This study considers and contributes to the literature on learning design, differences between face‑to‑face and online learning and the role played by academic staff and learning technologists in the design of MOOCs. The study is based on rich qualitative data drawn from 12 semi‑structured interviews with nine academics and three learning technologists who used the framework for constructing MOOCs. This study evaluates: (1) how the framework was used and supported; (2) benefits of the framework to support good practice in learning design and the design process; and (3) limitations of the framework. We also considered suggested enhancements to the framework. The study highlighted new areas that could influence the design process, such as the importance of the learning technologist as a facilitator of the MDMF, the benefits of the visual aspects of the framework, technological challenges, and users’ level of digital literacy.

 

Keywords: Learning Design, MOOCs, Online Learning, Curriculum Development, Academic Development, Learning Technologists

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 6 Issue 1 / Mar 2008  pp1‑75

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Editorial

A new issue of EJEL brings seven interesting pieces of research from different countries around the world. The learners involved in these researches range from school children to mature postgraduate students; they are of a variety of nationalities, they have differing previous experience and are of both genders. The learners have different modes of working; on‑campus or at a distance, and the educators have a variety of approaches and strategies to meet the difficulties their learners face. Reading these papers gives an insight to the challenges that the e‑Learning community faces. Overwhelmingly I am left with the view that there is no one‑size‑fits‑all in e‑Learning; we must be prepared to consider the individual if e‑Learning is to succeed.

 

Keywords: Asynchronous, community participation, construction technique, culture, curriculum development, distance learning, diversity, e-learning, engagement, evaluation, flexible learning, Greece, higher education, ICT, information and communication technology, instructional design, instructivism, international, LMS, Marginalized, online courses, online evaluation, online learning, participation, pedagogical development., postgraduate studies, quality assessment, secondary, socio-constructivism, study guide, test, time-management, virtual classroom, widening participation

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 6 Issue 2 / Apr 2008  pp99‑182

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Keywords: Asynchronous, community participation, construction technique, culture, curriculum development, distance learning, diversity, e-learning, engagement, evaluation, flexible learning, Greece, higher education, ICT, information and communication technology, instructional design, instructivism, international, LMS, Marginalized, online courses, online evaluation, online learning, participation, pedagogical development., postgraduate studies, quality assessment, secondary, socio-constructivism, study guide, test, time-management, virtual classroom, widening participation

 

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