The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

Online Students: Relationships between Participation, Demographics and Academic Performance  pp19-28

J. Coldwell, A. Craig, T. Paterson, J. Mustard

© Mar 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 75

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Using information technology to support teaching and learning is becoming ubiquitous in tertiary education. However, how students participate and perform when a major component of the learning experience is conducted via an online learning environment is still an open question. The objective of this study was to investigate any relationships between the participation, demographics and academic performance of students in an information technology course that was taught wholly online. Through a detailed analysis of tracking data of student participation, which was automatically collected by the online learning environment, it was found that a relationship existed between students' participation in the online learning environment and their performance, as measured by final results in the course. Relationships also existed between gender, nationality, participation and performance. However, there was no relationship between age and performance and participation. These findings suggest that when designing online learning for a diverse population, student demographics should be taken into account to maximise the benefits of the learning experience.

 

Keywords: culture, diversity, online learning, participation

 

Share |

Journal Article

Mediating Diversity and Affection in Blended Learning: a Story With a Happy Ending  pp310-319

Dina Soeiro, António Dias de Figueiredo, Joaquim Armando Gomes Ferreira

© Aug 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, Special ECEL issue, Editor: Sue Greener and Asher Rospigliosi, pp257 - 379

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

We had an Interpersonal Relationships course, a large class, around fifty students, working collaboratively in groups where students from different degrees, academic years, and ages, most of them deaf, tried, and to some extent were able, to communicate. We analyze this example of how diversity can be an asset and how learning management systems can act as mediators to overcome the challenges of diversity and the barriers of emotional isolation. We were carrying out a participatory action research project, within a blended learning environment supported by Moodle, to develop collaborative and personal pedagogical strategies to improve the inclusion and engagement of higher education students in their own learning and evaluation. We were using content analysis of the online discussions held by the students, of the reflective descriptions of the classes, of the students’ e‑portfolios, and of the interviews with the students. The paper describes how, in the context of this project, we have discovered that a learning management systems can be a powerful mediator in promoting the inclusion of deaf students and in establishing emotional bridges across gaps that face‑to‑face environments are sometimes unable to span.

 

Keywords: affection, blended-learning, deaf students, diversity, higher education, inclusion, participation

 

Share |

Journal Article

Learner Differences in Perceived Satisfaction of an Online Learning: an Extension to the Technology Acceptance Model in an Arabic Sample  pp412-430

Ahmed Al-Azawei, Karsten Lundqvist

© Oct 2015 Volume 13 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp317 - 445

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: Online learning constitutes the most popular distance‑learning method, with flexibility, accessibility, visibility, manageability and availability as its core features. However, current research indicates that its efficacy is not consistent acro ss all learners. This study aimed to modify and extend the factors of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to examine perceived satisfaction of an Arabic sample in online learning. The integrated factors in the modified model includes: deep level (lea rning styles), surface level (gender), and cognitive (online self‑efficacy) factors. Learning styles were chosen as a central factor. Hence, the online course was purposefully developed to support one pole in each dimension of Felder and Silverman Le arning Styles Model (FSLSM) in order to reveal the pedagogical implications of learning styles on learner satisfaction. A total of 70 learners participated voluntarily in the research. At the end of the online course, they were requested to fill in two questionnaires: the Index of Learning Styles (ILS) and a standard questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the latter were firstly analysed to validate the instrument. Then, Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling (PLS‑SEM) was conduc ted to examine the proposed hypotheses. The model achieves an acceptable fit and explains 44.8% of variance. Perceived usefulness represented the best predictor, whereas online self‑efficacy and perceived ease of use failed to show a direct impact on perc eived satisfaction. Furthermore, neither learning styles nor gender diversity had direct influence on the dependent factors. Accordingly, the research suggested that other variables may have to be integrated to enhance the power of the model.

 

Keywords: Keywords: online learning, learning styles, gender diversity, online self-efficacy, learner satisfaction, Technology Acceptance Model, TAM

 

Share |

Journal Article

Educational Games in Practice: The challenges involved in conducting a game‑based curriculum  pp122-135

Björn Berg Marklund, Anna-Sofia Alklind Taylor

© Jan 2016 Volume 14 Issue 2, ECGBL 2015, Editor: Robin Munkvold, pp81 - 149

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: The task of integrating games into an educational setting is a demanding one, and integrating games as a harmonious part of a bigger ecosystem of learning requires teachers to orchestrate a myriad of complex organizational resources. Historicall y, research on digital game‑based learning has focused heavily on the coupling between game designs, previously established learning principles, student engagement, and learning outcomes much to the expense of understanding how games function in their int ended educational contexts and how they impact the working processes of teachers. Given the significant investments of time and resources teachers need to make in order to conduct game‑based learning activities, the foci of past research is problematic as it obfuscates some of the pressing realities that highly affect games viability as tools for teaching and learning. This paper aims to highlight the demands that the implementation and use of an educational game in formal educational settings puts on te achers working processes and skillsets. The paper is based on two case studies in which a researcher collaborated with K‑12 teachers to use MinecraftEdu (TeacherGaming LLC, 2012) as a classroom activity over a five‑month long period. By documenting bot h the working processes involved in implementing the game into the classroom environment, as well as the execution of the actual game‑based classroom activities, the studies identified a wide variety roles that a teacher needs to take on if they are to ma ke games a central part of a school curriculum. Ultimately, the paper highlights the importance of understanding the constraints under which teachers work, and argues that a better understanding of the contexts in which games are to be used, and the roles teachers play during game‑based learning scenarios, is a necessary foundation for improving games viability as educational tools.

 

Keywords: Keywords: computers in classroom, distraction, gaming literacy, student diversity, teacher roles, challenges of game-based learning

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 6 Issue 1 / Mar 2008  pp1‑75

Editor: Shirley Williams

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Editorial

A new issue of EJEL brings seven interesting pieces of research from different countries around the world. The learners involved in these researches range from school children to mature postgraduate students; they are of a variety of nationalities, they have differing previous experience and are of both genders. The learners have different modes of working; on‑campus or at a distance, and the educators have a variety of approaches and strategies to meet the difficulties their learners face. Reading these papers gives an insight to the challenges that the e‑Learning community faces. Overwhelmingly I am left with the view that there is no one‑size‑fits‑all in e‑Learning; we must be prepared to consider the individual if e‑Learning is to succeed.

 

Keywords: Asynchronous, community participation, construction technique, culture, curriculum development, distance learning, diversity, e-learning, engagement, evaluation, flexible learning, Greece, higher education, ICT, information and communication technology, instructional design, instructivism, international, LMS, Marginalized, online courses, online evaluation, online learning, participation, pedagogical development., postgraduate studies, quality assessment, secondary, socio-constructivism, study guide, test, time-management, virtual classroom, widening participation

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 6 Issue 2 / Apr 2008  pp99‑182

Editor: Shirley Williams

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: Asynchronous, community participation, construction technique, culture, curriculum development, distance learning, diversity, e-learning, engagement, evaluation, flexible learning, Greece, higher education, ICT, information and communication technology, instructional design, instructivism, international, LMS, Marginalized, online courses, online evaluation, online learning, participation, pedagogical development., postgraduate studies, quality assessment, secondary, socio-constructivism, study guide, test, time-management, virtual classroom, widening participation

 

Share |