The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

The Flipped Classroom, Disruptive Pedagogies, Enabling Technologies and Wicked Problems: Responding to the Bomb in the Basement  pp106-119

Maggie Hutchings, Anne Quinney

© Feb 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, ICEL2014, Editor: Paul Griffiths, pp57 - 148

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Abstract

Abstract: The adoption of enabling technologies by universities provides unprecedented opportunities for flipping the classroom to achieve student‑centred learning. While higher education policies focus on placing students at the heart of the education pr ocess, the propensity for student identities to shift from partners in learning to consumers of education provides challenges for negotiating the learning experience. Higher education institutions (HEIs) are grappling with the disruptive potential of te chnology‑enabled solutions to enhance education provision in cost‑effective ways without placing the student experience at risk. These challenges impact on both academics and their institutions demanding agility and resilience as crucial capabilities for universities endeavouring to keep up with the pace of change, role transitions, and pedagogical imperatives for student‑centred learning. The paper explores strategies for effective change management which can minimise risk factors in adopting the disrupt ive pedagogies and enabling technologies associated with â flipping the classroom⠒ for transformative learning. It recognises the significance of individual, cultural and strategic shifts as prerequisites and processes for generating and sustaining cha nge. The analysis is informed by the development of a collaborative lifeworld‑led, transprofessional curriculum for health and social work disciplines, which harnesses technology to connect learners to humanising practices and evidence based approaches. R ich data from student questionnaires and staff focus groups is drawn on to highlight individual and organisational benefits and barriers, including student reactions to new and challenging ways of learning; cultural resistance recognised in staff sceptici sm and uncertainty; and organisational resistance, recognised in lack of timely and responsive provision of technical infrastructure and support. Intersections between research orientations, education strategies and technology affordances will be explored as triggers for transformation in a â triple

 

Keywords: Keywords: Transformative learning, change management, flipped classroom, technology-enabled learning, role transitions, organizational change

 

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Journal Article

Bridging the Gap: A Computer Science Pre‑MOOC for First Semester Students  pp248-260

Bernadette Spieler, Maria Grandl, Martin Ebner, Wolfgang Slany

© Jul 2020 Volume 18 Issue 3, Editor: Lars Elbæk, pp207 - 274

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Abstract

Knowledge in Computer Science (CS) is essential, and companies have increased their demands for CS professionals. Despite this, many jobs remain vacant. Furthermore, computational thinking (CT) skills are required in all contexts of problem solving. A further serious problem arises from the gender disparity in technology related fields. Even if tech companies want to hire women in technology, the number of women who enter these fields is remarkably low. In high schools with no technical focus, most teenagers acquire only low‑level skills in CS. The consequences are misleading preconceptions about the fundamental ideas of CS and stereotype‑based expectations. Consequently, many teenagers exclude computing from their career path. In this paper, two promising concepts to overcome these challenges are presented. In 2018, a voluntary gamified lecture “Design your own app”, held at the University of Graz for students of all degree programs, was introduced. The course attracted over 200 students and received positive evaluations. This led to the second concept. In January 2019, a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) with the title “Get FIT in Computer Science” was designed and launched in August 2019 on the platform iMooX.at with the goal to provide a basic introduction to different concepts of CS, including programming and the application of game design strategies. The MOOC was accompanied by an offline lecture, following the principles of flipped classroom and inverse blended learning. For evaluation purposes, we collected data at three stages: 1) during the MOOC, 2) during the offline lecture, and 3) two months after the lecture. The results showed that the MOOC framework was a promising approach to support and motivate at least a certain group of first‑semester students, especially those who had no prior knowledge in CS.

 

Keywords: computer science education, digital literacy, technology enhanced learning, MOOC, flipped classroom, Pocket Code

 

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Journal Article

Learning Analytics in Flipped Classrooms: A Scoping Review  pp397-409

Muriel Algayres, Evangelia Triantafyllou

© Oct 2020 Volume 18 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen, Mie Buhl and Bente Meyer, pp373 - 459

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Abstract

The Flipped Classroom (FC) is an instruction method, where the traditional lecture and homework sessions are inverted. Online material is given to students in order to gain necessary knowledge before class, while class time is devoted to application of this knowledge and reflection. The hypothesis is that there could be deep and creative discussions when teacher and students physically meet, which has known a significant surge of popularity in the past decade. A marked recent trend in the FC is the increased use of Learning Analytics (LA) to support the development of the FC and students’ reflexive learning. The aim of this paper is to investigate the literature on applications of LA in FCs, and to determine the best practices and needs for technological development supporting LA in the FC by means of a scoping review. This literature review revealed that there is potential in using LA in the FC, especially as a means to predict students’ learning outcome and to support adaptive learning and improvement on the curriculum. However, further long‑term studies and development is necessary to encourage self‑directed learning in students and to develop the whole of the FC for a more diverse population of students. We anticipate an increased and expanded use of LA to come, with focus on predictive and prescriptive analytics providing more adaptive learning experience. We also anticipate that LA will expand beyond data mining to correlate student performance and online engagement with the aim to include a wider range of possibilities of interventions and adaptation of the learning experience.

 

Keywords: active learning, flipped classroom, learning analytics, virtual learning environment, educational data mining

 

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