The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Interventions for Second‑Order Change in Higher Education: Challenges and Barriers  pp85-92

Sebastian Fiedler, Terje Väljataga

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

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Abstract

From 2005 to 2008 the international research and development project iCamp carried out a series of targeted educational interventions into existing teaching and studying practices within a cluster of European universities. These interventions were meant to establish educational experiences that would correspond with key features of international, distributed and technologically mediated work settings. The main educational objective was the advancement of important dispositions (skills, knowledge, attitudes and orientations) for collaborating with others and for self‑directing intentional learning projects in such settings. The large‑scale, homogenous and centrally administered landscapes of tools and services commonly provided in institutions of higher education proved to be conceptually and technologically incompatible with iCamp's overall intervention perspective. Instead, iCamp fostered the systematic use of loosely‑coupled, networked tools and services in the realm of social media and social software (such as Wikis, Weblogs, Webfeeds, etc.) to augment personal and distributed learning environments. The conceptual and technological shift provoked by iCamp challenged institutional representatives, facilitators, and students alike. This paper focuses on the description and interpretation of some key challenges, tensions, and barriers experienced by the research and intervention team in the context of the final field study carried out within the project. The paper finally suggests that the reported challenges and barriers represent re‑occurring problems in educational research and argues for the need to develop an adequate conceptual framework for educational intervention that focuses on second‑order change.

 

Keywords: educational intervention, social media, higher education, system change

 

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Journal Article

Investigating Students’ Attitudes, Motives, Participation and Performance Regarding Out‑of‑Class Communication (OCC) in a Flipped Classroom  pp550-561

Tristan Cui, Andrew Coleman

© Dec 2020 Volume 18 Issue 6, Editor: Heinrich Söbke and Marija Cubric, pp462 - 574

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Abstract

In a flipped classroom, students engage in active learning during class time and have individual information‑transmission outside class time. University students need to complete the pre/post‑class activities to fully benefit from flipped classroom. It is important that teachers adopt practical methods including teacher‑student out‑of‑classroom communication (OCC) to help students manage their time effectively and stay on task. This research examines the practice of OOC in a flipped first‑year postgraduate Business Law course at an Australian university that comprises a large overseas student cohort. By means of a questionnaire, the researcher collected data about student perceptions of OCC, their motives for engaging in OCC, and the change of the motives in a flipped classroom. Student demographics, online participation, and academic performance data were exported from the university database. The student answers, participation, and performance were measured and compared with t‑tests. The preliminary results show that in a flipped classroom, students were more motivated to engage in OCC. Moreover, the short‑term online participation improved for the students who were communicated by the teacher outside classroom. However, an analysis of the data indicated no statistically significant difference in students’ academic performance. In the concluding sections of this paper, the limitations of this study are acknowledged, followed by several recommendations for future research.

 

Keywords: Out-of-classroom communication (OCC), flipped classroom, motivation, intervention

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 18 Issue 6 / Dec 2020  pp462‑574

Editor: Heinrich Söbke, Marija Cubric

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Keywords: Community of Inquiry, continuing education, distance education, deep learning design, constructivist learning; academic dishonesty, cheating, online education, distance education, plagiarism; ODeL, online learning tools, mobile learning tools, Moya Messenger App WhatsApp, myUnisa’s ODF; Emotions and learning, flipped learning, university, science education; creativity, personality traits, students, virtual courses, gender differences; EFL learner, mobile learning, smartphone and language learning, attitudes and perceptions, process of learning English; Out-of-classroom communication (OCC), flipped classroom, motivation, intervention; ; ICT integration, ICT infrastructure, high school science teaching

 

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