The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

Online Continuing Education for Health Professionals: Does Sticky Design Promote Practice‑relevance?  pp466-474

Roxanne Ward Zaghab, Carlos Maldonado, Dongsook Whitehead, Felicia Bartlett, Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner

© Dec 2015 Volume 13 Issue 6, ICEL 2015, Editor: Pandora Johnson, pp429 - 474

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: Online continuing education (CE) holds promise as an effective method for rapid dissemination of emerging evidence‑based practices in health care. Yet, the field of CE continues to develop and delivery is predominately face‑to‑face programs. P ractice‑oriented online educational methods and e‑learning platforms are not fully utilized. Educational theorists suggest an experiential approach to CE consistent with adult learning theory. A compelling question remains: Can online asynchronous CE prog ramming prepare health care providers in delivering higher‑level practice competencies?. To address this question, the authors have identified seven composite ⠜sticky⠀ factors that have been critical to the engagement of learners and the creation and delivery of practice‑oriented online educational programs (Zaghab et al, 2015). The sticky factors are based in knowledge management (Nonaka, 1994; Szulanski, 2002) and adult education or andragogy (Knowles, 1970; 1984). In this paper, sticky factor s are mapped to Moore and colleagues⠒ (2009) higher level learning outcomes in health care CE. Data are presented on learner reported practice‑related outcomes in a selection of online CE courses on the CIPS Knowledge Enterprise⌢ portal with the Uni versity of Maryland School of Pharmacy⠒s Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions (CIPS). A dynamic, adaptive e‑learning environment built by technology partner, Connect for Education, Inc., provides the innovative platform and the Acclaim! interactiv e learning technology. This technology‑instructional partnership is dedicated to an iterative continuous improvement process called the Learner Stewardship Cycle (Zaghab et al, 2015). The cycle improves stickiness and learner engagement in order to achi eve higher‑level learning outcomes in CE. Findings suggest that of the 769 learners successfully completing an online course with two or more sticky design segments, the majority report reaching level 4, 5 and 6 learning competencies. Learners from the pr ofessions of pharmacy, nursing, medicine, and other health

 

Keywords: Keywords: Health Care Practitioner, continuing education, situated online learning, learner engagement, continuous improvement, and practitioner-learner

 

Share |

Journal Article

3‑M Model for Uncovering the Impact of Multi‑level Identity Issues on Learners’ Social Interactive Engagement Online  pp131-143

Paula Charbonneau-Gowdy, Jessica Chavez

© Jun 2019 Volume 17 Issue 2, Editor: Antonios Andreatos, Cleo Sgouropoulou and Klimis Ntalianis, pp66 - 172

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: A growing trend in higher education institutions (HE) to move course offerings to Blended Learning (BL) modes is challenging many of our traditional views and practices of teaching and learning. Part of the problem is that many of those working within these institutions at the macro, meso and micro levels have stubbornly resisted abandoning the view that knowledge is imparted by the institution and that knowledge is consumed by students. Advances in technology have upturned this positionality as learners and institutions alike realize that roles are evolving in the process of education. Tracking the scholarship on BL, for example, reveals a major issue preventing successful learning outcomes is reticence on the part of learners to be socially interactive and engaged online. Through the lens of socialcultural and identity theories and a conceptualization of engagement being composed of behavioural, emotional and cognitive components, this paper aims to respond to a call for greater insight into this pressing issue. With findings from a recent qualitative longitudinal study of a BL program in a large private‑for‑profit university in Chile we unravel the complex social psychological aspects that contribute to learners’ willingness, or unwillingness, to engage in interacting with others and with content online – an essential determinant of successful learning and quality BL programs. A critical discussion of the findings from multiple qualitative data sources reveals that the general lack of undergraduate students’ incentive to develop agency and adopt empowered learner identities characteristic of active participators online, is strongly influenced by the assumed or imposed identities of teachers, academic leaders and institutional decision makers that create a climate that fails to nurture community building in these contexts. Abundant evidence suggests a model for BL in HE that could lead to decisive, strategic and coordinated action at each level and measurable improvement in student online learning engagement and outcomes.

 

Keywords: Blended Learning, higher education, learner engagement, macro-meso-micro level inquiry, identity theory

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 17 Issue 2 / Jun 2019  pp66‑172

Editor: Antonios Andreatos, Cleo Sgouropoulou, Klimis Ntalianis

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: e-Learning, distance education, technology enhanced learning, life-long learning, deep and meaningful learning, POGIL, online education, formative assessment, health information management, electronic health records, learning design, learning design tools, learning designer, teacher training , inclination to complete, learning engagement, learning motivation, massive open online course, online learning, Blended Learning, higher education, learner engagement, macro-meso-micro level inquiry, identity theory, audio games, serious games, augmented reality, augmented reality audio, audio interaction, music education, play-to-engage, participatory co-creation, indigenous community engagement, culture

 

Share |