The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Competency — and Process‑Driven e‑Learning — a Model‑Based Approach  pp183-194

Katrina Leyking, Pavlina Chikova, Peter Loos

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

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Abstract

As a matter of fact e‑Learning still has not really caught on for corporate training purposes. Investigations on the reasons reveal that e‑Learning modules like WBTs often miss any relevance for the tasks to be accomplished in the day‑to‑day workplace settings. The very learning needs both from an organizational and individual perspective are neglected. Content brought to the learner very often meets neither the individual competency gaps nor the organizational learning goals. Time passed between acquisition and application of knowledge is too long. In short, business processes on the one side and learning‑related processes on the other are not aligned adequately. Thus, we see an urgent need for concepts on how to derive corporate training actions from business tasks in order to improve employees' business performance. This paper presents an integrated approach for competency‑ and business process‑driven learning management supported by information technology (IT), developed within two projects named PROLIX and EXPLAIN.

 

Keywords: authoring, business process management, competency development, learning content, learning objectives, learning processes

 

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Journal Article

Exploring the e‑Learning State of Art  pp149-160

Evelyn Kigozi Kahiigi, Love Ekenberg, Henrik Hansson, F.F Tusubira Danielson, Mats Danielson

© Apr 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp99 - 182

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Abstract

e‑Learning implementation is an area in progress that continues to evolve with time and further research. Researchers in the field argue that e‑Learning is still in its infancy, resulting into numerous implementation strategies across a wide e‑Learning spectrum. This paper explores the e‑Learning state of art. It provides a general overview of the learning process, evaluates some current implementation trends pointing out a range of frameworks and strategies used in the past decade. It further looks at the changes created by the adoption of e‑Learning within the higher education process. This is followed by an identification of emerging issues from which two problems are identified; 1) the limited uptake of technology as an instruction delivery method; and 2) the ineffective use of technology to support learning. In respect to this, future research should therefore seek to further investigate these aspects and to explore suitable approaches for effective implementation of e‑Learning to support learning. Not the least in higher education contexts.

 

Keywords: e-Learning learning, e-Learning implementation higher education, learning process, learning theories, learning methods

 

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Journal Article

Designing competency based e‑Learning initiatives  pp220-229

Giota Xini, Kostas Petropoulos

© Jan 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Special Issue for ECEL 2003, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 239

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Abstract

 

Keywords: Personalised learning, e-Learning process, learning delivery

 

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Journal Article

Designing educational games for computer programming: A holistic framework  pp281-298

Christos Malliarakis, Maya Satratzemi, Stelios Xinogalos

© Jun 2014 Volume 12 Issue 3, Special Edition for ECGBL 2013, Editor: Carlos Vaz de Carvalho and Paula Escudeiro, pp227 - 311

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Abstract

Abstract: Computer science is continuously evolving during the past decades. This has also brought forth new knowledge that should be incorporated and new learning strategies must be adopted for the successful teaching of all sub‑domains. For example, com puter programming is a vital knowledge area within computer science with constantly changing curriculum and its teaching remains a difficult endeavour. On the other hand, students start from a very early age to interact with computers through games and ot her entertaining multimedia software. Therefore, they seem to be keen on environments with impressive special effects and graphical interfaces where they interact with the environments elements. In response, teachers are trying to connect computer progra mming learning with computer operations that students are familiar with, which does not include textual editors for programming lines of code with no other interaction. Educational games used in computer programming courses are considered to benefit learn ing, because they motivate students towards actively participating and interacting with the games activities. Thus, we have developed an educational multiplayer game that aims to further enhance computer programming education by addressing occurring prob lems. This process, however, requires proper planning during the design of educational games, and thus the availability of adequate guidelines that include all characteristics that should be incorporated in such games. This paper aims to introduce and ela borate on a holistic framework that has been constructed as a guide towards the development of this game. To this end, we study existing frameworks that have been proposed for the design of educational games and document features currently supported by ed ucational games that teach computer programming. We conclusively propose the framework we have constructed for the design of our game. This framework can be used for the design of other computer programming‑specific educational games and extended for othe r educational domains.

 

Keywords: Keywords: computer programming, educational programming environments, educational games, holistic framework, learning process

 

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Journal Article

Evaluation as a Powerful Practices in Digital Learning Processes  pp290-300

Birgitte Holm Sørensen, Karin Tweddell Levinsen

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

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Abstract

Abstract: The present paper is based on two empirical research studies. The Netbook 1:1 project (2009⠍2012), funded by the municipality of Gentofte and Microsoft Denmark, is complete, while Students⠒ digital production and students as learning desig ners (2013⠍2015), funded by the Danish Ministry of Education, is ongoing. Both projects concern primary and lower secondary school and focus on learning design frameworks that involve students⠒ agency and participation regarding digital production i n different subjects and cross‑disciplinary projects. Within these teacher‑designed frameworks, the students perform as learning designers of learning objects aimed at other students. Netbook 1:1 has shown that digital and multimodal production especially facilitates student‑learning processes and qualifies student‑learning results when executed within a teacher‑designed framework, which provides space for and empowers students⠒ agency as learning designers. Moreover, the positive impact increases when students as learning designers participate in formative evaluation practices. Traditionally, the Danish school has worked hard to teach students to verbalise their own academic competencies. However, as our everyday environment becomes increasingly comple x with digital and multimodal technologies, formative evaluation as a learning practice becomes central, requiring the students to develop a digital and multimodal literacy beyond the traditional, language‑centred type. In order to clarify these practices , we address the various understandings of evaluation and assessment that may blur our arguments. Students⠒ digital production and students as learning designers is a large‑scale project that follows up on the findings of Netbook 1:1. It experiments fur ther with various evaluation practices in a digitalised learning environment that focuses on different phases of the learning processes and includes feed‑forward and feedback processes. Evaluation as a learning practice in a digitalised learning context f ocuses on students as actors, addressing their s

 

Keywords: Keywords: Assessment, evaluation, formative evaluation, summative evaluation, self-evaluation, peer evaluation, teacher evaluation, digital learning processes, multimodality, evaluation design, agency, empowerment, reflection, construction of meaning

 

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