The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

An Innovative Junior Faculty Online Development Program  pp166-173

Luis M. Villa, Olga M. de la Rosa

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp87 - 173

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This study examines whether two online courses offering educational support for junior faculty have a positive effect on their attitudes and curriculum and teaching capacities (CTC) learning. The data used in the analysis are from two 2005 online University training courses. The tasks the online courses assign to faculty, the resources they provide, the learning environment they create, and the conversations they provoke proved to be consequential in shaping faculty's attitudes. The results also indicate that junior faculty who participate in individual and collective online developing activities, such as constructing teaching episodes and communicating with other colleagues, are more likely to gain a better understanding of how to teach their scientific disciplines.

 

Keywords: compulsory education, policy document

 

Share |

Journal Article

Some Factors to Consider When Designing Semi‑Autonomous Learning Environments  pp93-100

Paul Bouchard

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp85 - 190

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This research aims to answer the question, "in what ways do mediated learning environments support or hinder learner autonomy?" Learner autonomy has been identified as one important factor in the success of mediated learning environments. The central aspect of learner autonomy is the control that the learner exercises over the various aspects of learning, beginning with the decision to learn or not to learn. But as Candy (1995) points out, there are several areas where learner‑control can be exercised. The first are the motivational‑intentional forces that drive the learner to apply some determination (or "vigour") to the act of learning. They are the conative functions of learning and include learner intiative, motivation and personal involvement. They are often associated with life goals that are independent of the actual learning goals pursued within the strict confines of the learning environment (Long, 1994). The second area of learner‑control is the one comprising the "nuts‑and‑bolts" of the act of learning, such as defining learning goals, deciding on a learning sequence, choosing a workable pacing of learning activities, and selecting learning resources (Hrimech & Bouchard, 1998). These are the algorithmic aspects of learning, and in traditional schooling, they are the sole responsibility of the teacher. In mediated learning environments, it can be shared between the platform and the actual learner. Just a few years ago, learner control was necessarily limited to these two sets of features, conative and algorithmic. Today however, with the proliferation of educational offerings in both the private and public sector, as well as the developments in educational technology, two other aspects of the learning environment emerge as important areas where learner‑control can be exercised. The semiotic dimension of learner‑control includes the symbolic platforms used to convey information and meaning, for example web "pages", hypertext, videoaudio multimedia, animation, each of these bringing with them their own specific set of possibilities and limitations for autonomy in learning. And then again, all learning environments exist in their own distinct economic sphere where decisions about whether, what and how to learn are made on the basis of cost‑benefit, opportunity cost, and extrinsic market value. We will examine the implications of each of these areas of learner‑control, and share our analysis of a series of interviews with cyber‑learners, based on this framework of conative, algorithmic, semiotic and economic factors.

 

Keywords: self-directed learning, learner autonomy, educational policy, international development self-directed learning, learner autonomy, educational policy, international development

 

Share |

Journal Article

The VLE as a Trojan Mouse: Policy, Politics and Pragmatism  pp63-72

Mark Brown, Shelley Paewai, Gordon Suddaby

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper argues that selecting a new Learning Management System (LMS) is a strategic decision about the future direction of your institution. However, the development of a robust methodology for the selection of a new LMS is particularly challenging given the fluidity of the elearning environment. This is especially so when both quantitative and qualitative factors are overlaid by institutional requirements involving political considerations. Selecting the technology is only part of the process and the least problematic aspect. The real challenges are embedded in institutional culture. The paper reflects on the tactics, strategies and approval process involved in the decision to adopt Moodle to replace a proprietary system for the delivery of learning in New Zealand's largest university‑level distance education provider. Critical to the process was the explication of guiding principles, pedagogical criteria and identification of institutional requirements, along with politically astute alliances and allegiances to inform and endorse the selection process. Those centrally involved in the decision process draw on their experiences and reflect on the type of questions that senior managers need to ask when considering new strategic initiatives in open and distance learning.

 

Keywords: Moodle, learning management system, policy, leadership, institutional culture

 

Share |

Journal Article

Comparing Childrens E‑safety Strategies with Guidelines Offered by Adults  pp297-309

Birgy Lorenz, Kaido Kikkas, Mart Laanpere

© Aug 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, Special ECEL issue, Editor: Sue Greener and Asher Rospigliosi, pp257 - 379

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The ways our children are using Internet have changed significantly within the last five years: the Web experience is more personalised, social, open, self‑regulated and oriented towards ripping, remixing, sharing, following, reflecting. As a result, also e‑learning has recently become more social and open, involving the use of personal learning environments or social networks. We believe that the schools are not ready for this yet, as strategies and regulations supporting open learning are not up to date . It may seem easier to restrict the use of e.g. Twitter or Facebook rather than integrate them into the learning process. In 2011, we carried out the qualitative analysis of 201 e‑safety related short stories presented by students (aged 12 to 16), pa rents, teachers, school IT managers and police officials, collected through the Safer Internet in Estonia EE SIC campaign. 2/3 of the stories are fictional … they may be based on urban legends which however appear to refer to real stories. 1/3 of the sto ries reflect real incidents. We mapped typical behaviour patterns and beliefs regarding privacy as well as the regulations and limitations concerning the use of social networks at schools. Our study shows that typical safety incidents are not solved adeq uately when existing regulations are used by the schools. We found that most of the solutions used by schools to ensure e‑safety are either technical or purely regulation‑based, only some schools appeared to have studied or elaborated on pedagogical or be havioural aspects. Problems are defied by limitations and regulations, while actual safety incidents (whether in‑ or outside school) remain largely unsolved (or even undetected). Thus there is an urgent need for information and working guidance mechan isms for managers, teachers, parents and students. These matters must be solved before schools reach the critical mass in using e‑learning, social networks and modern gadgetry as parts of curriculum. Keywords: online safety, schools, policy, new technolog ies, social media

 

Keywords: online safety, schools, policy, new technologies, social media

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007 / Nov 2007  pp173‑250

Editor: Shirley Williams

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Editorial

The second International Conference on e‑Learning was held in New York during late June 2007. From the wealth of high quality papers submitted some 60 were selected for presentation at the conference. It was a very difficult task to select from these a group for inclusion in the journal, so it was decided that in this edition we would reflect the international nature of the conference and the diversity of learner groups and technologies addressed.

Recently a number of people from around the world have highlighted that children coming through the school system have different learning needs to previous generations, cultural and linguistic backgrounds are also cited as impacting on learning. However it is important that e‑Learning does not concentrate on a single demographic group and the papers in this edition present e‑Learning from different perspectives, including engaging with school‑aged children (O’Neill; Van de Sande and Leinhardt) and their teachers (Balcaen and Hirtz), through to the acceptance of e‑Learning by business (Leyking, Chikova and Loos). Nakayama, Yamamoto and Santiago have investigated the learning characteristics of university students from Japan and this on‑going work provides a useful insight for course developers, while Stoltenberg and Pforte look at the more technical aspects of e‑Learning and describe a prototype system developed for recording presentations.

 

Keywords: affective communication, affective states, assessment, community of practice, computing education, data warehouse, disaffection, distance education, education technology, eigenfaces, eigenvectors, evaluation system, data warehouse, face recognition, faculty development, focus group, higher education, image normalisation, impoverished learning, internet courses, junior faculty, novel program, ontology, ontology, pedagogical framework , performance metric, performance metric, policy document, post compulsory education, principal component analysis, professional development, quality evaluation, satisfaction, short-term module, staff development, statistics, teacher training, teaching practice, virtual entities, virtual environments, virtual learning environment, vocational students, web-based PBL, web-based SRL

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 2 / Jun 2007  pp87‑173

Editor: Shirley Williams

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Editorial

eLearning continues to develop and it is important that as there are developments the opportunity is taken to reflect on the impact of technology on enhancements to learning. In this issue we have included a number of papers that evaluate the use of eLearning from both the point of view of the learners and teachers.

Following best practice the format of the journal is now single column, this will make online reading easier than the old double column format.

 

Keywords: affective communication, affective states, assessment, community of practice, computing education, data warehouse, disaffection, distance education, education technology, eigenfaces, eigenvectors, evaluation system, data warehouse, face recognition, faculty development, focus group, higher education, image normalisation, impoverished learning, internet courses, junior faculty, novel program, ontology, ontology, pedagogical framework , performance metric, performance metric, policy document, post compulsory education, principal component analysis, professional development, quality evaluation, satisfaction, short-term module, staff development, statistics, teacher training, teaching practice, virtual entities, virtual environments, virtual learning environment, vocational students, web-based PBL, web-based SRL

 

Share |