The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Personal Learning Journal — Course Design for Using Weblogs in Higher Education  pp189-196

Stefanie Hain, Andrea Back

© Nov 2008 Volume 6 Issue 3, Editor: Shirley Williams, Laura Czerniewicz, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

This paper examines the impact of weblogs on individual learning processes in a university environment. It outlines experiences with weblogs as an instrument of learning reflection or a learning journal. This paper presents an innovative didactical concept based on the Web 2.0 paradigm and evolving technologies. Weblogs have emerged with the paradigm of Web 2.0 and user‑generated content and have gained in importance through the various evolving application contexts, for example, the transfer of knowledge within enterprises, the communication and exchange of experiences with customers, and even the acquisition of projects by power bloggers. In this paper, weblogs are considered in the specificity of learning journals that focus on two objectives: first, supporting individual learning by means of reflection as the most effective method of individual learning; and, second, multiplying these efforts through interaction and discussion within a group of individuals with common interests. The latter is based on contribution‑based pedagogies that maintain that collaboratively creating learning resources and sharing them with others are promising practices through which students can learn. Additionally, it is argued that this style of teaching relates to a growing trend in higher education in which the focus of learning is moving away from building a basic knowledge store and toward emphasizing a wider range of skills. We successfully applied the weblog approach to several academic courses during which qualitative and quantitative data were collected in an empirical study. This paper reflects our experiences with weblogs as a support for university lectures and is based on four semesters of exploration and adaptation. Within the scope of the research approach of design research (Hevner et al. 2004), it provides a structured method to support individual learning processes within a learning community realized by a weblog in the specificity of a learning journal. Verification with students and experts has led to a holistic method through which lecturers and coaches can successfully integrate weblogs into academic courses or even professional trainings. This paper addresses both academic learning and professional education management initiatives. Essentially, it aims at in‑house trainings in enterprises, vocational schools, and universities. Interviews with experts will also reveal how to successfully align this method with professional trainings. In conclusion, this paper suggests a method with which to design a learning environment by means of learning journals to enforce increased individual learning. More specifically, it reveals that learning journals enable the achievement of level three (transfer to and application in the working environment) of Kirkpatrick's (1994) four‑level model, which was generated to evaluate learning programs.

 

Keywords: Web 2.0, weblog, learning log, learning journal, learning reflection, contribution-based theory

 

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Journal Article

The Playful and Reflective Game Designer  pp271-280

Gunver Majgaard

© Jun 2014 Volume 12 Issue 3, Special Edition for ECGBL 2013, Editor: Carlos Vaz de Carvalho and Paula Escudeiro, pp227 - 311

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Abstract

Abstract: A group of first‑semester engineering students participated in a game design course. The aim of the course was to learn how to design computer games and programming skills by creating their own games, thereby applying their game‑playing experien ces to gain knowledge about game design. The aim was for students to develop a more critically reflective perspective on video games and game design. In applying their game experiences, they developed their own digital prototypes and participated in refl ective discussions on the concept of games: what makes them interesting and how they are constructed. The students used the GameMaker programming tool, which can be used without any prior programming knowledge. The tool allows for the easy development of 2D game prototypes.The didactic approach was based on play as a lever for the design process, and on constructionistic and reflective learning philosophies. Playing games constituted an integral element of the design process; new code added to the program was tested by playing the game. The students were constantly alternating between playing and adding and revising code. The learning environment where games were played and developed could be considered to be a sandbox where experimentation was a motivati onal factor for the students, as they could make mistakes and try out creative ideas. Although the constructionistic learning approach promoted creative and innovative learning, it did not develop competencies in articulation and analysis. The aim was for students to reflect on games in order to promote explicit knowledge. Based on the theory, we consider retrospective reflective discussions in the classroom and their programming experiences reinforced the learning process. In summary, we present the stud ents' first progression from native consumers in the game world to becoming reflective designers. Along their journey, they developed a reflective practice and an understanding of the profession they were entering. The article also throws light on the ver y dynamic and fruitful relationship that ex

 

Keywords: Keywords: Learning, play, constructionism, reflection, game-based learning, game design, serious games, university pedagogy

 

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Journal Article

Evaluation as a Powerful Practices in Digital Learning Processes  pp290-300

Birgitte Holm Sørensen, Karin Tweddell Levinsen

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

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Abstract

Abstract: The present paper is based on two empirical research studies. The Netbook 1:1 project (2009⠍2012), funded by the municipality of Gentofte and Microsoft Denmark, is complete, while Students⠒ digital production and students as learning desig ners (2013⠍2015), funded by the Danish Ministry of Education, is ongoing. Both projects concern primary and lower secondary school and focus on learning design frameworks that involve students⠒ agency and participation regarding digital production i n different subjects and cross‑disciplinary projects. Within these teacher‑designed frameworks, the students perform as learning designers of learning objects aimed at other students. Netbook 1:1 has shown that digital and multimodal production especially facilitates student‑learning processes and qualifies student‑learning results when executed within a teacher‑designed framework, which provides space for and empowers students⠒ agency as learning designers. Moreover, the positive impact increases when students as learning designers participate in formative evaluation practices. Traditionally, the Danish school has worked hard to teach students to verbalise their own academic competencies. However, as our everyday environment becomes increasingly comple x with digital and multimodal technologies, formative evaluation as a learning practice becomes central, requiring the students to develop a digital and multimodal literacy beyond the traditional, language‑centred type. In order to clarify these practices , we address the various understandings of evaluation and assessment that may blur our arguments. Students⠒ digital production and students as learning designers is a large‑scale project that follows up on the findings of Netbook 1:1. It experiments fur ther with various evaluation practices in a digitalised learning environment that focuses on different phases of the learning processes and includes feed‑forward and feedback processes. Evaluation as a learning practice in a digitalised learning context f ocuses on students as actors, addressing their s

 

Keywords: Keywords: Assessment, evaluation, formative evaluation, summative evaluation, self-evaluation, peer evaluation, teacher evaluation, digital learning processes, multimodality, evaluation design, agency, empowerment, reflection, construction of meaning

 

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Journal Article

Student's Reflections on Their Learning and Note‑Taking Activities in a Blended Learning Course  pp43-53

Minoru Nakayama, Kouichi Mutsuura, Hiroh Yamamoto

© Apr 2016 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECEL 2015, Editor: Amanda Jefferies and Marija Cubric, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

Abstract: Student's emotional aspects are often discussed in order to promote better learning activity in blended learning courses. To observe these factors, course participant's self efficacy and reflections upon their studies were surveyed, in addition to the surveying of the metrics of student's characteristics during a Bachelor level credit course. Regarding the causal relationships between these factors, the contributions of the factors of self efficacy and other characteristics were evaluated. The c ontents of notes students took during the course were lexically evaluated to determine whether this activity promoted reflection. Four indices of note‑taking activities were extracted from the lexical analysis. Correlation analysis was conducted, and acco rding to the provisional results of the correlation analysis between the four indices of note‑taking and student's characteristics of their own degree of self efficacy, there were some significant relationships between note‑taking indices and some of the self assessment indices, such as word rates in notes and the degree of out of course study, and between the content coverage of notes taken and self understanding.

 

Keywords: Keywords: note-taking, blended learning, student's reflection, student's characteristics, causal analysis, text analysis

 

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Journal Article

How Note‑Taking Instruction changes Student's Reflections upon their Learning Activity during a Blended Learning Course  pp200-210

Minoru Nakayama, Kouichi Mutsuura, Hiroh Yamamoto

© Jun 2017 Volume 15 Issue 3, Editor: Jarmila Novotná and Antonín Jančařík, pp199 - 280

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Abstract

The metrics of self efficacy and self assessment were surveyed and analysed in order to examine the effectiveness of note taking instruction on emotional aspects of participants during a blended learning course. The changes of emotional aspects due to student's individual characteristics were also analysed. Participants were surveyed twice during the course, using the metrics mentioned above, and their emotional and cognitive changes were evaluated. The number of valid participants was 54. Scores of metrics between the two surveys were compared. Though most scores for self‑efficacy and self assessment decreased, this suggests that participants recognised their actual learning situation well. The relationship between the metrics and student's characteristics was examined. To illustrate participant's emotional and cognitive changes, causal analysis was introduced. The relationships between scores for self‑efficacy and self evaluation in the two surveys were analysed and compared. Also, the impact of improvements in note‑taking skills on changes in self‑efficacy and self‑evaluation were examined using causal analyses. These results show that note‑taking activities significantly stimulated the level of self‑efficacy and self‑assessment when the lecturer's instructions were able to improve note‑taking skills factor scores during the course.

 

Keywords: Note-taking, reflection, self-efficacy, student's characteristics, correlation analysis, causal analysis

 

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Journal Article

Securing Trust, Roles and Communication in E‑Advising – Theoretical Inputs  pp211-219

Ole Jørgen S. Ranglund, Anette Danielsen, Linda Kiønig, Tone Vold

© Jun 2017 Volume 15 Issue 3, Editor: Jarmila Novotná and Antonín Jančařík, pp199 - 280

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Abstract

Students claim to learn a lot from advising and feedback on assignments. This is one of the results in a survey amongst students at The Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences. Traditionally, advising is mainly a face‑to‑face activity. However, with an increasing number of courses offered online, it is timely to discuss how to conduct advising sessions online and using an online medium. The meeting between the student and advisor contains a number of factors; for example: eye contact, tone of voice and facial mimic. Many subtle features establish the relationship between the advisor and student. The student needs to communicate the assignment and to trust the advisor, at the other hand the advisor needs to be reassured that the student understand and trust the feedback. This paper discusses how written advising sessions can be undertaken using an online medium, and still maintain the roles, the trust and secure the communication.

 

Keywords: e-advising, reflection, reflective practitioners, trust, competency

 

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Journal Article

Building the Future Students' Blended Learning Experiences from Current Research Findings  pp133-140

Amanda Jefferies, Ruth Hyde

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

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Abstract

Between March 2007 and February 2009, the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded a Learners Journeys project at the University of Hertfordshire. This was part of their second phase of investment in research into the Learners' Experiences through their E‑Learning Programme and was known as LXP2. STROLL (STudent Reflections On Lifelong e‑Learning), as the Learners' Journeys project was known, researched into the experiences of current undergraduate students in Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE) primarily through a series of diaries constructed by student volunteers. Using video and audio recording to capture students' own reflections on their learning and their use of technology over the 2 year period the project data has offered many reflections from students on their use of technology for both learning and leisure. Building on this and other recent research data, the authors now suggest that for many HE students, technology has become a ubiquitous part of their lives to the extent that they may own or access regularly multiple items of personal technology that are used interchangeably for learning and leisure, including their computers and their mp3 players. At the University of Hertfordshire access to technology enhanced learning has included use of the managed learning environment (MLE) which is called StudyNet. This MLE has been highly praised by the campus‑based undergraduates and especially those participating in STROLL for making their learning accessible wherever and whenever they want to access it. In this paper we explore how academics might learn from the experience of these current students and their reflections on becoming effective learners supported by technology. This research indicates that technology can be a vital support for students in their complex balancing act between their busy studying, working and personal lives and the students have enthusiastically reported that technology is a key enabler for them. This paper presents the ways in which students use technology in HE and raises the questions of how institutions might support some of the diverse needs of future students.

 

Keywords: student experience, blended learning, technology use, reflection

 

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Journal Article

Electronic Assessment and feedback tool in Supervision of Nursing Students During Clinical Training  pp42-56

Sari Mettiäinen

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp1 - 56

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Abstract

Abstract: The aim of this study was to determine nursing teachers and students attitudes to and experiences of using an electronic assessment and feedback tool in supervision of clinical training. The tool was called eTaitava, and it was developed in Fi nland. During the pilot project, the software was used by 12 nursing teacher and 430 nursing students. Nine of the teachers participated in the interviews and survey, and 112 students responded to the survey. The data were mainly analysed with qualitativ e methods.In the eTaitava web‑based user interface, the teacher constructs questions to map the students learning process, and sets them to be sent on a daily basis. According to the findings, four‑fifths of the students responded to the questions almost daily. They thought the software was easy to use and answering the questions took about 5 minutes a day. Based on the students and teachers experiences, the use of the electronic assessment and feedback tool supported supervision of clinical training. It supported the students target‑oriented learning, supervised the students daily work, and made it visible for the teachers. Responding to the software questions inspired the students cognitive learning, and based on the responses, the teachers notice d which students needed more support and could consequently allocate them more supervision time. Responding also supported the students continuous self‑evaluation, and considering the responses structured the students and teachers final assessment disc ussion. By means of the electronic assessment and feedback tool, it is possible to promote learning during clinical training by challenging students to reflect on their learning experiences. Students professional development process can be supported thr ough pedagogically planned conceptual supervision which is integrated into experiential learning during clinical training.The findings of the pilot study were encouraging, indicating that the method is worth further development and potentially useful in s upervision in all fields of education.

 

Keywords: Keywords: eLearning, mobile application, nursing, clinical training, supervision, reflection

 

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