The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

Developing Critically Thoughtful e‑Learning Communities of Practice  pp173-182

Philip L. Balcaen, Janine R. Hirtz

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

In this paper, we consider an approach to developing critically thoughtful e‑Learning communities of practice„where participants are deliberate about the use of specific intellectual tools supporting critical thinking. We address Garrison & Anderson's (2003) argument that such critical thinking should play a central role within the ecology of e‑ Learning communities and provide our view of what such communities might look like. To do this, we offer four categories of strategies helping to develop such communities„collaborative agreement on goals; facilitator(s) modelling and teaching the tools supporting critical thinking; and shaping communicative interactions within the e‑Learning environment to encourage thinking. We provide examples from a current study involving 36 kindergarten to grade 12 teachers' blended use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and face‑to‑face sessions to illustrate our view.

 

Keywords: critical thinking, communities of practice, tools for thought, e-Learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Behind the Scenes with OpenLearn: the Challenges of Researching the Provision of Open Educational Resources  pp139-148

Stephen Godwin, Patrick McAndrew, Andreia Santos

© Apr 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp99 - 182

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Web‑enabled technology is now being applied on a large scale. In this paper we look at open access provision of teaching and learning leading to many users with varying patterns and motivations for use. This has provided us with a research challenge to find methods that help us understand and explain such initiatives. We describe ways to model the research and identify where pressures and contradictions can be found, drawing on a reflective view of our own practice in performing the research. Open educational resources are defined as technology‑enabled educational resources that are openly available for consultation, use and adaptation by users for non‑commercial purposes (UNESCO, 2002). OpenLearn is one of the largest of such initiatives and is committed to the provision of open educational resources for all. It is being developed by The Open University and is primarily sponsored by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. It provides users with over 4 200 hours of higher educational material drawn from Open University courses. Other learning tools such as discussion forums, video conferencing, and knowledge mapping software are also available to the user. In this paper we aim to introduce OpenLearn and outline some of the main research issues surrounding such an initiative. We seek to explore theoretical and practical approaches that can provide suitable tools for analysis. Activity theory is seen as a suitable approach for macro analysis and its use is illustrated in terms of the complexity of large scale research. Activity theory, besides informing research perspectives, can be turned in upon the research process itself allowing us to consider the challenges and context of the research. By using activity theory in this way and illustrating from a range of practical approaches we demonstrate and illustrate a useful research approach.

 

Keywords: e-Learning, open content, tools, action research, activity theory

 

Share |

Journal Article

Wiki Tools in the Preparation and Support of e‑Learning Courses  pp123-132

Antonin Jancarik, Katerina Jancarikova

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Wiki tools, which became known mainly thanks to the Wikipedia encyclopedia, represent quite a new phenomenon on the Internet. The work presented here deals with three areas connected to a possible use of wiki tools for the preparation of an e‑learning course. To what extent does Wikipedia.com contain terms necessary for scientific lectures at the university level and to what extent are they localised into other languages? The second area covers the use of Wikipedia as a knowledge base for e‑learning study materials. Our experience with Enviwiki which originated within the E‑V Learn project and its use in e‑learning courses is presented. The third area aims at the use of wiki tools for building a knowledge base and sharing experience of the participants of an e‑learning course.

 

Keywords: Wikipedia, wiki tools, enviwiki, e-learning, localization, mathematics education

 

Share |

Journal Article

Adopting a web‑based collaborative tool to support the Manchester Method approach to learning  pp62-69

Philip Drinkwater, Christine Adeline, Simon French, Nadia Papamichail, Tudor Rickards

© Jan 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Special Issue for ECEL 2003, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 239

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

 

Keywords: Copmuter mediated communication, collaborative tools, group work, Information and Communication Technologies, ICT's, teaching and learning strategies, web-based learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Moodle as an ODL teaching tool: A Perspective of Students and Academics  pp282-290

Nurkhamimi Zainuddin, Rozhan Idrus, Ahmad Farid Mohd Jamal

© Nov 2016 Volume 14 Issue 4, Editor: Guest Editors, Rozhan M. Idrus and Nurkhamimi Zainuddin, pp233 - 290

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This article describes the use of Moodle as a suitable platform to support the postgraduate open and distance learning (ODL) courses offered by Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia (USIM). Many USIM postgraduate students who take obligatory courses (e.g., research methodology and data analysis) are taught at different venues to facilitate students’ access to higher education and enhance quality of lifelong learning. Managing this complex teaching network has called for the adaptation of Moodle platform. This approach meets two relevant requirements, (a) to ensure consistency, compliance, and quality of teaching, (b) to reduce educational costs, which largely depend on the number of peripheral venues for teaching activities. This article analyses the functionalities of the Moodle platform and its use among USIM postgraduate students and academics. The data was collected based on content analysis via questionnaire applied to 18 USIM ODL postgraduate students and 4 lecturers. The results show that despite having great potential, Moodle is mainly used as a repository for materials. Moreover, lecturers recognize the importance of the use of other functionalities of this platform in order to promote the success of the teaching and learning process.

 

Keywords: open and distance learning, learning management systems, pedagogical tools, postgraduate courses, higher education

 

Share |

Journal Article

Familiarity with Technology among First‑Year Students in Rwandan Tertiary Education  pp30-45

Jean Claude Byungura, Henrik Hansson, Mugabe Muparasi, Ben Ruhinda

© Feb 2018 Volume 16 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp1 - 79

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The more the students get experienced with technologies, the more the need for tertiary education systems to adopt innovative pedagogical strategies for accommodating different learning needs. Depending on students’ prior experience with computer‑based tools, they may have different degrees of familiarity with new technologies. At University of Rwanda (UR), for example, the familiarity and experience with technology for incoming students is not clearly known. Universities need to understand this phenomenon for efficient education planning and management. Therefore, this study aims to understand the degree of familiarity with technology for first‑year students at the University of Rwanda. Accessibility, ownership, usage and previous computer‑based training are used in this study’ conceptual framework as factors that determine the degree of familiarity with technology. Firstly, results indicate that the majority of participants are not familiar with technology and never had any previous exposure to eLearning systems. Secondly, regarding the digital tools, while smartphones are the most accessed, owned and used tools by respondents, they rarely or never used them for learning activities. Thirdly, findings portrayed a heterogeneous technology experience with a substantial variation of access, use, ownership and previous training on new technologies among the sample. Strategies for improving experience and confidence with technology, for first‑year students, are recommended for this institution. This will prepare new students for early technology uptake and readiness while empowering them to develop appropriate competencies and skills for the digital age. Further studies in the area of experience with technology are also proposed.

 

Keywords: familiarity with technology, net generation, tertiary education, digital tools, digital skills, first-year students

 

Share |