The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Medical Student Perceptions of Integration of a Customized Cloud Based Learning Operating System into Problem Based Learning Tutorials  pp25-39

Rima Abdul Razzak, Zuheir Hasan, Arpan Stephen

© Jan 2020 Volume 18 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Heinrich Söbke, pp1 - 115

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Abstract

Since its inception, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at the Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the problem based (PBL) pedagogy in Medicine relying on paper‑based trigger material. However, delivery of such paper‑based triggers during tutorial sessions was not optimal to promote medical student interactivity and engagement within tutorial sessions. As involvement of multimedia resources and tools in PBL are more valuable than simple print textual modes of learning and can have a positive impact on learning and knowledge integration, we aimed to digitize all our trigger material. Over the past three years CMMS has integrated after customization to PBL standards, the cloud‑based operating system, UNIO into its problem‑based learning (PBL) curriculum. The aim of UNIO integration was to digitize text triggers and enhance the quality of visual triggers in order to improve medical student interactivity and engagement within tutorial sessions. UNIO electronic platform was customized from a teacher‑centered design to fit a PBL pedagogy. It was utilized to link student and tutor hardware within a group together for promoting interaction and collaborative learning. The effect of this teaching approach was evaluated from student responses to an in‑house validated survey at the end of the fifth PBL module. Customization and integration of UNIO within the PBL curriculum resulted in an entirely paperless learning process. It created an integrated PBL system combining conventional text trigger in a digital form with digital media such as images, videos and other multimedia, while maintaining face‑to‑face setup. It also provided online and off ‑live access to content embedded at campus and open access to open source content online to both tutors and students. Results of the student satisfaction survey pointed to a predominantly neutral attitude towards integration of UNIO within our PBL tutorial sessions, but the item related to effectiveness of media triggers within UNIO received favorable responses from students. Further evaluation for a longer term is necessary for additional student feedback. Other forms of evaluation may be required in the aim of improvement and for justification of subsequent implementation of UNIO within our PBL curriculum.

 

Keywords: PBL, Medicine, Cloud-based learning, UNIO

 

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Journal Article

Face‑to‑face vs. Real‑time Clinical Education: no Significant Difference  pp287-296

Y.Q. Mohammed, G. Waddington, P. Donnan

© Feb 2008 Volume 5 Issue 4, e-Learning in Health Care, Editor: Pam Moule, pp251 - 304

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Abstract

The main objective of this pilot research project was to determine whether the use of an internet broadband link to stream physiotherapy clinical education workshop proceedings in "real‑time" is of equivalent educational value to the traditional face‑to‑face experience. This project looked at the benefits of using the above technology as an educational tool and its impact on educators only, it did not investigate possible related factors such as the cost of employing this technology nor the technicalities of setting up the proposed technology as these objectives were beyond the scope of the study. In 2006 three physiotherapy educators' workshops were selected for streaming at the University of Canberra. Two groups of educators attended the workshops at geographically separate venues, face‑to‑face (on‑site) and real‑time internet streaming (off‑site). Group one (on‑site) attended face‑to‑face lectures at the Canberra Hospital ACT Australia; lectures were streamed using a standard personal computer and digital camera to group two (off‑site) at the University of Canberra and Calvary Hospital ACT. At the end of the workshops all participants completed the questionnaire survey. Obtained results were analyzed using t‑tests. No significant difference was found between the participants' assessment of the educational value derived from either off or on‑site attendance at the workshop.

 

Keywords: face-to-face, real-time, educators, clinical education, interactions internet broadband, telemedicine, videoconferencing

 

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Journal Article

Efficacy of Teaching Clinical Clerks and Residents how to Fill out the Form 1 of the Mental Health Act Using an e‑Learning Module  pp239-246

Sarah Garside, Anthony Levinson, Sophie Kuziora, Michael Bay, Geoffrey

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

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Abstract

Background: Every physician in Ontario needs to know how to fill out a Form 1 in order to legally hold a person against their will for a psychiatric assessment. These forms are frequently inaccurately filled out, which could constitute wrongful confinement and, in extreme circumstances, could lead to fines as large as $25,000. Training people to fill out a Form 1 accurately is a large task, and e‑learning (Internet‑based training) provides a potentially efficient model for health human resources training on the Form 1. Objective: In this study, we looked at the efficacy of an e‑learning module on the Form 1 by comparing baseline knowledge and skills with posttest performance. Methods: 7 medical students and 15 resident physicians were recruited for this study from within an academic health sciences setting in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada (McMaster University). The intervention took place over 1 hour in an educational computing lab and included a pretest (with tests of factual knowledge, clinical reasoning, and demonstration of skill filling out a Form 1), the e‑learning module intervention, and a posttest. The primary outcome was the change between pre‑ and posttest performance. A scoring system for grading the accuracy of the Form 1 was developed and two blinded raters marked forms independently. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two sequences of assessments (A then B vs B then A), with a balanced design determining which test the participants received as either the pretest or posttest. Inter‑rater reliability was determined using the Intraclass Correlation. Repeated measures analysis of variance was conducted. Results: The Intraclass Correlation (ICC) as the measure for inter‑rater reliability was 0.98. For all outcome measures of knowledge, clinical reasoning, and skill at filling out the Form 1 there was a statistically significant improvement between pretest and posttest performance (knowledge, F(1,21) 54.5, p<0.001; clinical reasoning, F(1,21) 9.39, p=0.006; Form 1 skill, F(1,21) 15.7, p=0.001). Further analysis showed no significant differences or interactions with other variables such as between raters, the order of assessment, or trainee type. Conclusions: Under laboratory conditions, this e‑learning module demonstrated substantial efficacy for training medical students and residents on the theory and practice of filling out the Form 1 of the Mental Health Act. E‑learning may prove to be an efficient and cost‑effective medium for training physicians on this important medico‑legal aspect of care. Further research is required to look at the longer‑term impact of training and broader implementation strategies across the province for medical trainees and practicing physicians.

 

Keywords: medicine, skills, training, healthcare, education, psychiatry

 

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Journal Article

A Comparison Between Virtual Patient and Peer‑Assisted Learning in Teaching Basic Medical Knowledge and Skills  pp40-56

Lukas Seifert, Arda Manap, Jasmina Sterz, Ferdinand Gerlach, Robert Sader

© Jan 2020 Volume 18 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Heinrich Söbke, pp1 - 115

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Abstract

The Studentische Poliklinik is Germany’s first student‑run free clinic. Prior to fulfilling clinical obligations there, students must complete an extensive peer‑assisted learning program (PAL). Due to capacity constraints, a web‑based learning program involving virtual patients has been launched. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of Virtual Patient Learning (VPL) vs. PAL in the acquisition of basic medical knowledge and skills. Forty undergraduate medical students (m=9; f=31) in their third year were randomly assigned to either the PAL (n=20), or VPL (n=20). Short‑term (after each seminar) and long‑term learning retention (after completion of the electives) was measured using a validated theoretical test. Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) were used to assess practical knowledge. Additionally, the course itself was evaluated. Differences in theoretical knowledge between students in the PAL and VPL existed over the short term (VPL median = 100%; PAL median = 80; p = 0.006), but not over the long term (VPL = 94.17; PAL = 95.62 %; p = 0.617). An assessment of practical skills showed no differences in OSCE scores between the two different groups (VPL = 79.30 %; PAL = 80.26 %; p = 0.141). Students assessed their learning experience and the comprehensibility of seminars as either “very good” or “good”. Basic medical knowledge and skills can be taught as effectively using VPL as PAL. Given the cost‑effectiveness, high reproducibility and freedom of time and place, VPL should be performed more often when teaching family medicine in student‑run free clinics. Ultimately, this may result in enhanced treatment quality and patient satisfaction.

 

Keywords: Student-Run Free Clinic, Peer-assisted Learning, Web-based learning, Virtual Patient, Medical Education, Family Medicine

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 18 Issue 1 / Jan 2020  pp1‑115

Editor: Rikke Ørngreen, Heinrich Söbke

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Keywords: case study, development, educational change, e-learning, higher education, library, pedagogy, Research paradigm, research aims, research questions, design research, PBL, Medicine, Cloud-based learning, UNIO, Student-Run Free Clinic, Peer-assisted Learning, Web-based learning, Virtual Patient, Medical Education, Family Medicine, Information literacy, ICT4D, information access, contextualisation, education sector, game-based learning, educational games, learning games, framework, dimensions, factors, relations, game analysis, evaluation, design, digital and network society (DNS), open online learning (OOL), higher education (HE) curriculum, MOOC platforms, business model innovation, share economy, open education, Business Model Canvas

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 4, e-Learning in Health Care / Dec 2007  pp251‑304

Editor: Pam Moule

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Editorial

E‑learning is viewed as one way to support the development of healthcare professionals, offering flexible access to materials which enable practitioners to meet life‑long learning agendas. As a consequence a number of health professionals and health care institutions are looking to technology to provide necessary education, training materials and opportunities for personal and professional development and growth. The growing impetus to develop and embrace e‑learning in health care led to the convening of a mini‑track at the 6th European Conference on E‑Learning (ECEL) held in Denmark in 2007 and to invitations to support this Special Edition of the journal.

The papers present current international developments in the sector and capture the range of engagement in e‑learning from the instructivist provision of information through to engaging students in constructivist learning online. A range of health care professions is also represented in the discussions, as are differing education levels, from undergraduate to post graduate students and practitioners. Mohammed, Waddington and Donnan describe the use of an Internet broadband link to stream a ‘real time’ workshop to physiotherapists, whilst Burgess presents the use of e‑learning in a Nurse Prescribing Programme as part of a blended learning approach. Learner engagement through interactive online packages is described by Gilchrist and Lockyer et al. The paper by Lockyer et al additionally explores issues of transferring e‑learning into practice and the potential effects on patient care, a much under‑researched area. Pulman presents the benefits and limitations of project Virtual Europe, case scenarios that encourage learners to construct their learning through evaluating different approaches to health care across Europe. The final paper by Courtney focuses on the use of e‑learning by lecturing staff in health care. The use of an online Community of Practice to support lecturers developing Learning Objects (LOs) is considered and discussions developed to consider the role of LOs in practice education.

 

Keywords: Box and whisker plot, Boxplots, cancer care, clinical education, Communities of Practice, community development support, Designated Medical Practitioner, educators, e-learning, evaluation, face-to-face, health education, interactions, intercultural, international, internet broadband, Interprofessional learning, interprofessional Learning Objects, Interprofessional Practice, Learning Objects, nurse prescribing, nursing education, qualitative research, real-time, Reified Objects, Reusable learning object, simulated community, telemedicine, videoconferencing, Virtual Europe, workplace learning

 

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