The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

The Enhancement of Reusability of Course Content and Scenarios in Unified e‑Learning Environment for Schools  pp137-146

Virginija Limanauskiene, Vytautas Stuikys

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp85 - 190

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Abstract

With the expansion of e‑learning, the understanding and evaluation of already created e‑learning environments is becoming an extremely important issue. One way to dealing with the problem is analysis of case studies, i.e. already created environments, from the reuse perspective. The paper presents a general framework and model to assess UNITE, the unified e‑learning environment for schools, from the reuse perspective. UNITE is the e‑learning environment of the ongoing EU project (FP6 IST‑26964, 2006‑2008, http:www.unite‑ist.org). UNITE assets are described using feature diagrams (FDs) telling us about the internal structure of UNITE; representing relationships among the compound and atomic features, thus enhancing better transparency of UNITE and in this way empowering reuse. The factors of UNITE influential to reuse with some concrete results are also presented. We provide analysis aiming to extract from the model the relevant information of two kinds: (1) which is influential to reuse in a positive sense, i.e., enhancing reuse (e.g., application of meta‑design methodology for the scenarios description, classification of subjects in metadata, use of content management tools (e.g., Course editor, Metadata editor), multi‑linguistic approach, international and local collaboration between teachers and students in e‑learning scenario implementation and delivery, and methodological support, etc.) and (2) which is hindering reuse (e. g., age of the students, differences in national syllabus and national educational programmes, language, cultural and communication problems). Despite of some limitations of FDs, we found this notation useful because it allows the explicit representation of various aspects of the complex system (i.e., UNITE) focusing on variability of features and possible relationships and constraints. We focus on the aspects such as evaluation of the UNITE platform including tools, scenarios and content variability.

 

Keywords: Computer supported learning, e-learning environment development, meta-design, mobile learning, reusability

 

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Journal Article

Experiences with use of Various Pedagogical Methods Utilizing a Student Response System – Motivation and Learning Outcome  pp169-181

Ketil Arnesen, Guri Sivertsen Korpås, Jon Eirik Hennissen, John Birger Stav

© Aug 2013 Volume 11 Issue 3, ECEL 2012, Editor: Hans Beldhuis and Koos Winnips, pp168 - 272

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper describes use of an online Student Response System (SRS) in a pre‑qualification course for engineering studies in Norway. The SRS in use, where students answer quizzes using handheld mobile devices like Smartphones, PADs, iPods etc., has been developed at Sør‑Trøndelag University College. The development of the SRS was co‑funded by the Lifelong Learning Program KA3‑ICT in 2009‑2010. SRS has been designed to help teachers effortlessly i) break the monotony of a lecture and allow the students to actively take part in the lecture, ii) increase teacher‑student interaction, and iii) give teacher and students immediate anonymous feedback on learning outcome. The response system was used in mathematics in two groups with different lecturers during two semesters in 2009‑2010. The pedagogical methods in use will be referred to as “Peer Instruction” and “Classic”. In each method the students will answer a multiple choice quiz using their mobile devices. In both cases the result of the quiz will immediately appear as a histogram on a screen in the classroom. The closing parts will also be identical. The lecturer then highlights the correct option in the histogram and explains why this option actually is the correct one. In the Peer Instruction method there will be an additional element. The first poll will be followed by a discussion in student groups, where the students are urged to defend their choice and convince their fellow students that their chosen option is the correct one. The discussion is then followed by a new individual voting session before the final results are shown and the closing part takes place. The paper will compare this method with the peer instruction method as described in existing literature. The learning outcome will be discussed according to interviews with students and the lecturers’ experiences from the classroom. In addition we will analyze students’ grades and test results in mathematics with respect to their expected level, based on previous achievements. We will present results showing that when students are arguing their point of view, they will have a stronger tendency to convince their fellow students when they themselves already have found the correct option in the quiz. Finally we will suggest pedagogical improvements for future use of response systems in mathematics. Input from lecturers and from students has already been used in the process of developing a new version of SRS, finished in January 2013.

 

Keywords: Keywords: student response systems, mobile learning, smartphones, peer instruction and learning, peer learning assessment systems, learning outcome

 

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Journal Article

Mobile Learning: A Kaleidoscope  pp52-76

Marlena Kruger, Riana Bester

© Feb 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, ICEL2013, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: CTI is an accredited private higher education institution (university) with the Higher Education Council (HEC) in South Africa. Its head office is in Fourways, Johannesburg. CTI has 12 campuses nationwide and offers higher certificates and d egrees in commerce and information technology. These BCom and BSc degrees were rolled out to all 12 campuses from January 2013. All first year students received 10⠜ Samsung tablets with their textbooks and course materials in digital format. We⠒ve wor ked closely with all role‑players to ensure that all pillars for successful implementation of the e‑book tablet project are in place. Timeous completion and conversion of course materials and e‑textbooks for the start of the academic year in 2013 took ext ra time and focus of a dedicated project manager and multi‑disciplinary team members. Several aspects were focused on during the conceptual, preparation and planning phases in 2012 (phase 1). This phase included aspects such as the student pilot project to establish the most suitable tablet to procure for students and lecturers, upgrading of infrastructure on campuses, lecturer training and the development of support materials, guidelines and rules for user standards. Phase 2 started in January 2013 wit h the implementation of a design‑based research project which includes several planned interventions to ensure continuous development and support of lecturers and students with the focus on enhancing the academic experience of students. During this phase qualitative and quantitative methodologies were implemented and included the sharing of experiences using different digital media, tools and instruments to gather data from lecturers, students and other role‑players. Data was analysed and compared with di fferent theoretical frameworks for using integrating innovative technologies in learning environments. Changes that took place in teaching and learning practices will be discussed by way of using the technology integration matrix and other measurements to determine the development and movement of teachin

 

Keywords: Keywords: mobile learning, e-textbooks, tablet computers, faculty development, students enhancement of academic experience

 

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Journal Article

Telling Tales: Towards a new Model of Literacy Development Using e‑Readers in Teacher Education in Chile  pp84-96

Paula Charbonneau-Gowdy

© Feb 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, ICEL2014, Editor: Paul Griffiths, pp57 - 148

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Abstract

Abstract: Current debates on quality standards in education often look to the levels of an increasingly diverse array of literacies as a measure of that standard. At the same time, while mobile technologies are profoundly changing the way we live, communi cate and learn in our everyday lives, relatively little seems to be known about their potential to influence even basic literacy in formal education sites. Examining the use of practical and affordable emerging technologies in many countries worldwide whe re literacy rates are an issue, seems as yet to have been overlooked. Considering the implication of multiple literacy and communication skills to economic and cultural development and stability in emerging countries and increasingly in developed ones as well, finding immediate answers to challenges in this area is critical. This paper reports on a longitudinal study that examined the power of e‑readers to support change in the literacy habits and ultimately the learning cultures of a group of English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers‑in‑training in Chile. The aim of the study was to determine if access to low‑cost mobile readers and a social‑learning driven, technology‑supported, guided reading program, could reverse their literacy challenges. The s tudy is based on social‑cultural theory in which learner agency, access to funds of knowledge and social interaction are imperative ingredients for developing engaged, life‑long learners and readers. Participatory Action Research (PAR) is used to condu ct the inquiry. Working within a qualitative research paradigm, ethnographic tools and numerical data from pre‑ and post‑test results, helped to uncover how the use of technology influenced both the literacy practices and identities of the teachers‑in‑tra ining. The findings have led to the proposal of a new 21st century model for literacy education for such challenging contexts. This model could have important implications for Chile as well as learners, educators and policy makers elsewhere.

 

Keywords: Keywords: education in Chile, multi-literacies, teacher education, mobile learning, e-books, literacy in challenging contexts

 

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Journal Article

Developing and Testing a Mobile Learning Games Framework  pp151-166

Carsten Busch, Sabine Claßnitz, André Selmanagić, Martin Steinicke

© Mar 2015 Volume 13 Issue 3, ECGBL 2014, Editor: Busch-Steinicke, pp149 - 206

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Abstract

Abstract: In 2010 1.1 million pupils took private lessons in Germany, with 25% of all German children by the age of 17 having attended paid private lessons at some point in their school career (Klemm & Klemm, 2010). The high demand for support for learn ing curricular content led us to consider an integrated solution that speeds up both the design of mobile learning games as well as their implementation and adaption. This paper describes the iterative development of a game development framework for touch ‑based mobile learning games. The framework focuses on touch‑controlled interaction due to the fact that in 2014 more than 87% of German teenagers possess a smart phone with touch input (Feierabend, Plankenhorn, Rathgeb, 2014) as well as the possibility to engage in short bursts of learning experiences during their idle time, e.g. when commuting. The framework consists of a conceptual component that specifies five different game modes for casual mobile learning games. The technical part of the framework builds on the Unity game engine and offers an architecture that mirrors the game modes and objects from the conceptual part as well as a layer of service building blocks that cover generic functionality like logging, high score management or social media integration. The development of the framework is iterative and cyclic in that each produced game enriches the framework, which in turn accelerates the prototyping and development of further games. Additionally the games themselves are developed and teste d iteratively … both concerning usability/user‑experience and transfer, which is described in this paper. developed game prototype as well as the results of our usability tests.

 

Keywords: Keywords: mobile learning games, touch interfaces, private lessons, usability, software framework, transfer

 

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Journal Article

Correlating Questionnaire Data with Actual Usage Data in a Mobile Learning Study for High School Mathematics  pp76-89

Vani Kalloo, Permanand Mohan

© Mar 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, ICEL 2011, Editor: Philip Balcean, pp1 - 158

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Abstract

A mobile learning research project was conducted in Trinidad and Tobago to determine if mobile learning can assist high school students in learning mathematics. Several innovative techniques were used in this research to address the problem of high failur

 

Keywords: mobile learning, learning mathematics, high school mathematics

 

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Journal Article

Location‑Based Augmented Reality for Mobile Learning: Algorithm, System, and Implementation  pp138-148

Qing Tan, William Chang, Kinshuk

© Feb 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, ICEL2014, Editor: Paul Griffiths, pp57 - 148

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Abstract

Abstract: AR technology can be considered as mainly consisting of two aspects: identification of real‑world object and display of computer‑generated digital contents related the identified real‑world object. The technical challenge of mobile AR is to iden tify the real‑world object that mobile device's camera aim at. In this paper, we will present a location‑based object identification algorithm that has been used to identify learning objects in the 5R adaptive location‑based mobile learning setting. We wi ll also provide some background of the algorithm, discuss issues in using the algorithm, and present the algorithm empowered mobile learning system and its implementation.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Augmented Reality, Object Identification, Location-Based Adaptive Mobile Learning

 

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